War of the Rebellion: Serial 084 Page 0840 LOUISIANA AND THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI. Chapter LIII.

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SAINT JOSEPH, August 24, 1864.

Major LEONARD,

Fayette:

General Rosecrans telegraphs me at this date that A. K. Miller, formerly editor of Evening News, in Saint Joseph, informs him that Major Leonard, Ninth Missouri State Militia, with 280 men, was sent out to catch Anderson. A few miles from town they were fired into by Anderson's band of forty-four men, and instead of cleaning them out, as they should have done, marched on and went into camp about two miles beyond. Anderson's gang then went into the town just left by Major Leonard, and remained there several hours, helping themselves to what they wanted. It is also reported that Major Leonard's men behaved in a very disorderly manner, stealing horses, &c. Is it impossible, major, that this report can be true? for the honor of our arms and the credit of the good old fighting reputation of the Ninth I trust not. You will immediately report the facts to me.

CLINTON B. FISK,

Brigadier-General.

GLASGOW, August 24, 1864.

General FISK:

The Omaha, laden with Government stores for Leavenworth, just arrived. Fired into, heavy volley, twelve miles below. One badly wounded. The captain, McGinnis, will remain here and abandon the trip, unless the Fanny Ogden can be had or send an escort to protect when getting wood. What are your orders?

L. C. MATLACK,

Major, Commanding Post.

SAINT JOSEPH, August 24, 1864.

Major L. C. MATLACK,

Glasgow, Mo.:

I will try and get the Fanny Ogden to Glasgow speedily. We have not the force at Glasgow to furnish a guard to Leavenworth, but will manage some way to get the Omaha through. Where is Major Leonard and his men? Why don't you send out 100 men promptly in the direction of the attack and kill the bushwhackers? Have your carbines arrived yet?

CLINTON B. FISK,

Brigadier-General.

GLASGOW, August 24, 1864.

General C. B. FISK:

Major Leonard was to have left yesterday for the region of Rocheport and southeast, designing to move up north and west. I did not send out in the direction of the attack because I supposed they would leave immediately. That they did so I know since my telegram to you by the arrival of a prisoner they had who saw the attack and saw them leave at a rate that would give them thirty miles the start of my men.