War of the Rebellion: Serial 084 Page 0776 LOUISIANA AND THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI. Chapter LIII.

Search Civil War Official Records

HDQRS. DIST. OF MINNESOTA, DEPT. OF THE NORTHWEST,

Saint Paul, Minn., August 19, 1864.

Captain E. B. CARLING,

Chief Quartermaster of District, Present:

CAPTAIN: In reply to your letter of explanations and inquiry of this date, relative to the Government animals in this district and the disposition to be [made] of them during the ensuing winter, General Sibley directs me to state that he understands that you are to make the necessary arrangements for housing and feeding at Forts Ridgely and Ripley 400 horses each, 800; Fort Abercrombie, 100; Pomme de Terre and Alexandria 25 each, 50; Sauk Centre, 25; Wadsworth, 40; at the outposts north and south of Ridgely, 100; thus disposing of 1,115. The remaining 735 to make up the entire number proposed to be retained in this district for the public service must be provided for either wholly at Fort Snelling, or in part at that post, and the keeping of the remainder given out on contract to respectable and responsible parties subject to the daily supervision of a Government agent. This plan will obviate the expense attendant upon the erection of new stables at Fort Snelling, now that lumber is unprecedentedly high. General Sibley is decidedly opposed to any expenditure in buildings which can possibly be avoided. All the mules and horses mentioned as required in this district not otherwise provided for should be housed and the surplus should be given for keeping to the lowest responsible bidder.

By command of Brigadier-General Sibley:

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. C. OLIN,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HDQRS. DIST. OF MINNESOTA, DEPT. OF THE NORTHWEST,

Saint Paul, Minn., August 19, 1864.

Major JOHN CLOWNEY,

Commanding Fort Wadsworth:

DEAR MAJOR: I have your private communication of 10th instant relating to the supposed existence of coal in the vicinity of Fort Wadsworth. You are right in keeping the matter from obtaining publicity, as the advantage, if any is to be gained, should accrue to the Government in the first place, and the fact be communicated through the regular military channels, that the superior authorities in Washington may give the necessary directions. You will please therefore to advise me confidentially, after you have made the proposed explorations, of the result, and if the discovery proves to be valuable the report will at once be transmitted to department headquarters to be forwarded. In addition to your ordinary official dispatches. I shall be glad to receive an occasional private letter from you, giving such suggestions and information of matters abut the post, &c., as might not be suited to an official letter. I shall be glad to receive such at any time.

Very sincerely, yours,

H. H. SIBLEY,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.