War of the Rebellion: Serial 084 Page 0642 LOUISIANA AND THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI. Chapter LIII.

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ATCHISON, August 10, 1864.

Major-General CURTIS:

One coach just arrived from west. No mail or passengers through. Indians have murdered all families on Little Blue. One entire family, eight in number. Fifteen are known to be killed. All families are moving in for safety.

N. G. GILLESPIE,

Agent Overland Stage Line.

FORT LEAVENWORTH, August 10, 1864.

N. A. GILLESPIE,

Atchison, Kans.:

Dispatch received. When were Indians last seen? How far from Kearny or Atchison? What militia could be called out nearest to the scene of slaughter?

S. R. CURTIS,

Major-General.

ATCHISON, August 10, 1864.

Major-General CURTIS:

One hundred and eighty miles from Atchison; seventy this side of Kearny. Two men killed ten miles this side Kearny and train burned thirty-five above yesterday.

N. A. GILLESPIE,

Agent, &c.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF UPPER ARKANSAS,

Fort Riley, August 10, 1864.

Major General S. R. CURTIS,

Commanding Department of Kansas:

GENERAL: I have forwarded you by this day's mail a petition from the citizens of Shirley, Republic, and Washington Counties, asking protection from Indian depredations. I received the paper by the hands of Captain I. M. Schooley, of the Sixth [Seventeenth] Regiment Kansas State Militia, who was deputized by the citizens of the counties named to confer with me upon the supposition that they were embraced in my district. If my district was extended on the guide meridian to the northern boundary of Kansas, and I could have a few additional squadrons of cavalry, I think I could give protection to the frontier settlements. It appears that the Indians who commit depredations on this line of communications west, as well as the route through South Nebraska, take refuge between the two roads on the Republican, and I am of the opinion that hostile parties are there at present, near Lake Sibley. The establishment of a post near that point (Lake Sibley) with one or two squadrons of cavalry, would afford protection to the settlement on the Republican. Captain Schooley informs me that the State militia in that section have no arms. They number but a small force, as the country is sparsely settled, but they are very anxious to be armed, and if armed would make a good auxiliary force in case of serious trouble.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAS. G. BLUNT,

Major-General.