War of the Rebellion: Serial 084 Page 0584 Chapter LIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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GENERAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. DIST. OF EASTERN ARKANSAS, Numbers 51.

Helena, Ark,. August 6, 1864.

Pursuant to orders from Brigadier General N. B. Buford, the undersigned assumes command of the District of Eastern Arkansas. The following officers are announced as the staff of the colonel commanding, and will be obeyed and respected accordingly; Captain T. C. Meatyard, assistant adjutant-general; First Lieutenant F. E. Snow, Sixth Minnesota Infantry, acting assistant adjutant-general; First Lieutenant Henry C. Murdock, Thirty-fifth Missouri Infantry, acting aide-de-camp.

WM. CROOKS,

Colonel Sixth Minnesota Infantry, Commanding.

DEVALL'S BLUFF, August 6, 1864-11.30 a.m.

Captain C. H. DYER,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Little Rock:

Colonel Geiger left here one hour ago, with 1,500 strong. Shall send him copies of your dispatches immediately. It has occurred to me to be a good plan to send one infantry regiment five miles above Augusta, to move out to Prospect Bluff or Searcy, distance about twenty-three miles. No boat here now; Celeste went to Des Arc to-day for quartermaster.

C. C. ANDREWS.

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

DEVALL'S BLUFF, August 6, 1864-11.45 a.m.

Colonel OLIVER WOOD,

Brownsville, Ark.:

Send this to General West, at Austin:

Colonel Geiger left here about an hour ago with 1,500 cavalry strong. His advance guard preceded him to Hickory Plains and Sandy Ford of Bayou Des Arc. Shall immediately forward to him dispatches received from General West and from General Carr.

C. C. ANDREWS

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Numbers 140.

Saint Louis, Mo., August 6, 1864.

Brigadier General James Totten, Missouri State Militia, having received orders to report for duty to the major-general commanding Division of West Mississippi is hereby relieved from duty at these headquarters, and will proceed without delay in obedience thereto. In relieving General Totten from duty, the commanding general feels it incumbent upon him to publicly acknowledge his sense of the many and important services rendered by General Totten in this department and also to express his sincere regret that the exigencies of the military service call him away from the sphere of duty where for more than three years he has rendered such distinguished services. Whether in the field or in the bureau, his services reflect great credit upon him and upon the military service. The regret of the general commanding at losing General