War of the Rebellion: Serial 084 Page 0443 Chapter LIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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SAINT JOSEPH, July 28, 1864.

Lieutenant Colonel A. J. SWAIN,

Chillicothe, Mo.:

You will move the available militia to-morrow morning southeasterly into Chariton County, with directions that they immediately open communication by messenger with Colonel Moberly at Brunswick and Captain Stanley at Keytesville. There are about 200 guerrillas in Chariton to-night. Captain Stanley is begging for re-enforcement. I want your forces to arrange a combination of movements with Moberly and Stanley and Crandall, at Brookfield, that will thoroughly kill and weed the villains out of Chariton County. How many men will go in this expedition, and who will command them?

CLINTON B. FISK,

Brigadier-General.

SAINT JOSEPH, July 28, 1864.

Lieutenant-Colonel SWAIN,

Chillicothe, Mo.:

Colonel Meller will receive orders to-night. Let him be ready to march to-morrow morning.

CLINTON B. FISK,

Brigadier-General.

SAINT JOSEPH, July 28, 1864.

Lieutenant Colonel A. J. SWAIN,

Chillicothe:

Captains Tate and Brady will be relieved, turn over their public arms and go home. Please communicate to them my grateful acknowledgments for their prompt coming forth to the bugle blast of changer. Ask them to hold themselves at home as minutemen. I fear we shall have hot work if Price's army gets into Missouri, of which, I confidently tell you, there is considerable danger just now. Thornton's conspiracy is rapidly flickering out. His men are broken up into small squads and are being raked out of the bush in Platte and Clay by the dozens and mustered out. Many are deserting him. One entire Paw Paw company sent me in a petition to-day asking that they might turn again and live. One party of about 200 crossed the Missouri near Lexington. The largest party west of Grand River is near Hainesville. They number about 200. The Sixth Cavalry are after them, with death in their train. I don't believe Mr. Thornton thinks he can hold North Missouri.

CLINTON B. FISK,

Brigadier-General.

HAINESVILLE, July 28, 1864.

General FISK:

I have just returned from Fishing River bottom. There was a small force of guerrillas here last night. Thornton has undoubtedly left. From all I can learn they are all leaving. We have killed several. I will remain here to-day; First Iowa at Salem.

E. C. CATHERWOOD,

Colonel, Commanding.