War of the Rebellion: Serial 084 Page 0402 Chapter LIII. LOUISIANA AND THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI.

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commanding officer of the regiment. The brigadier-general commanding desires to express his thanks to the officers and men of the company for their faithful performance of duty and so testify to their high military discipline while acting as his escort.

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By order of Brigadier General E. A. Carr:

C. H. DYER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF LITTLE ROCK,

Little Rock, Ark., July 26, 1864.

[Lieutenant Colonel W. D. GREEN,

Assistant Adjutant-General:]

COLONEL: I would respectfully recommend that requisitions be made for guns to mount in the permanent works in this district. I have no ordnance officer, and I think that the best officer to make the requisitions would be the ordnance officer of the department, as being more permanent than any other and having every convenience for receiving and issuing. I would suggest about eighteen guns for the defenses of Little Rock, twelve to be at least as heavy as 30-pounders, six for the defenses of Devall's Bluff, 20, 24, or 30 pounders (these not to be allowed to come to Little Rock to be shipped back), four or six for the defenses of Pine Bluff, 20, 24, or 30 pounders. In case of an attack from the enemy a powerful artillery will be a most important means of defense, and if the troops should move the field batteries will have to go with the army, in which case the presence of heavy batteries will produce a moral and, if necessary, a physical effect of great advantage.

E. A. CARR,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. FIRST DIV., 7TH ARMY CORPS, Numbers 20.

Little Rock, Ark., July 26, 1864.

The undersigned hereby assumes command of the First Division, Seventh Army Corps.

CYRUS BUSSEY,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

DEVALL'S BLUFF, July 26, 1864-8.30 a. m.

Captain C. H. DYER:

A general court-martial for trial of cases in cavalry regiments, ordered by General Steele, has just convened here. I think the best protection to the railroad is to keep the country well scouted from twenty to forty miles from it, which can be done if the cavalry is here. It seems to me if the cavalry remained here ten days longer even, it could get into better condition as to shoeing horses, &c., and the rifle-pits could progress faster. I shall certainly have no means for scouting unless another regiment besides the Third Michigan is left here. It takes 209 men a day for picket and four squadrons for Remount Camp.

C. C. ANDREWS,

Brigadier-General.