War of the Rebellion: Serial 084 Page 0159 Chapter LIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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that the rapidly gathering clans of rebels hold all the country around him. I am pushing the organizations under General Orders, Numbers 107, as rapidly as possible, but every telegram from the eastward is a wet blanket upon the measure. I shall hasten to Saint Louis, where I hope to meet the Governor. Every loyal man in Missouri will have to shoulder his gun for the war, and that, too, without delay. The very atmosphere is rank with treason.

CLINTON B. FISK,

Brigadier-General.

SAINT JOSEPH, MO., July 12, 1864

Colonel O. D. GREENE,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

Matters in Platte County grow no better. Major Clark, of the Eighty-second Enrolled Missouri Militia, who commanded in Platte County, came to this city this evening, having been a prisoner in the hands of the rebels, but escaped. The greater part of four companies of the Eighty-second Enrolled Missouri Militia, Paw Paws, deserted him, quietly surrendered to the rebels, and were at once sworn into the Confederate service by Thornton, who is commander. He has not less than 400 men well armed, clothed in rebel uniform, and avowing their intention to scatter destruction far and wide. Saint Joseph and Weston are to be sacked. There seems to have been a general uprising in Thornton's favor. Men are joining them singly and in squads. There is certainly great danger, and it is increasing.

G. A. HOLLOWAY,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

GLASGOW, July 12, 1864.

Major-General CURTIS:

I will thank you for all information as to condition of affairs in Platte and Clay that you can give me. I am at work day and night in the river counties, getting the Enrolled Missouri Militia into active service that I may concentrate reliable troops.

CLINTON B. FISK.

Brigadier-General.

FORT LEAVENWORTH, July 12, 1864.

General C. B. FISK,

Glasgow:

I am requested to send you this dispatch, just received from Colonel Park, refugee from Parkville. There is rebel gas for you.

WAYNDOTTE, July 12, 1864.

Major-General CURTIS:

Rebels report at Parkville that Colonel Thornton raised Confederate flag at Platte City. Said he orders to raise 10,000 men, and he would do it quick-conscript, if they did not volunteer. He says Tom McCarthy has raised 1,500 in Illinois and coming through tearing up Hannibal and Saint Joseph Railroad. They are flocking to him from all quarters. Paw Paws, by understanding, surrendered and joined them.

G. S. PARK.

S. R. CURTIS,

Major-General.