War of the Rebellion: Serial 084 Page 0158 LOUISIANA AND THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI. Chapter LIII.

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some scouts and spies to ascertain Jackman's intentions and movements. Look well to the road between Cassville and Fayetteville. We have one train below now. Fight Jackman if you have an opportunity.

JOHN B. SANBORN,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

GLASGOW, MO., July 12, 1864.

Major-General ROSECRANS:

I had the honor to request that 200 Enrolled Missouri Militia be placed in active service at Macon City immediately.

CLINTON B. FISK.

Brigadier-General.

GLASGOW, July 12, 1864.

Major-General ROSECRANS:

I have arranged a combined movement against Thornton and the treacherous Paw Paws at Platte City. Lieutenant-Colonel Draper moves from Saint Joseph with about 200 men; Colonel Ford, from Kansas city, with about 400, and General Curtis sends about 300 from Fort Leavenworth. The plan is to surround the villains to-night, and I hope for a lesson that will deter other counties from the same experiment. The Confederate flag has been waving over Platte City for two days, protected by men who for many months have worn our uniforms and carried under the stars and stripes the guns they now turn against us. I hope our troops will take no prisoners.

CLINTON B. FISK,

Brigadier-General.

GLASGOW, July 12, 1864.

Major-General ROSECRANS:

Dispatches from my headquarters at Saint Joseph indicate that my most serious fears as to the reliability of my troops in Platte and Clay Counties have become reality. Major J. M. Clark, Enrolled Missouri Militia, who was in command of all the militia in Platte County, reached Saint Joseph last evening, and gives me the following report:

The Confederate guerrilla outlaws under Thornton occupy Platte City; they numbered yesterday about 400 men. The Paw Paw militia in Platte County, with scarcely an exception, went over to Thornton in a body, and the great mass of the citizens have thrown off the mask and declared openly for Jeff. Davis and the Southern Confederacy. An abundance of Confederate uniforms was found to be in waiting at Platte City, and the Paw Paws with alacrity exchanged their blue jackets for gray ones. Major Clark reports the uprising among the people as general. Thornton instructs his command in an open speech to spare no Unionist on any terms. I greatly fear that many of the 107 organizations in these river rebel counties will turn out to be re-enforcements for the rebels. General, be not deceived, Missouri is as rebellious to-day as ever, and the earlier the national authorities act upon this conclusion the better. It will require more than 5,000 reliable, U. S. troops to hold my district from a general uprising; every hour I spend among the people confirms me in this opinion.

General Douglass writes me from the Columbia Court-House, where he is in a state of siege, that he cannot come to the river to meet me,