War of the Rebellion: Serial 084 Page 0138 LOUISIANA AND THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI. Chapter LIII.

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OPPOSITE PARKVILLE, July 11, 1864.

Major-General CURTIS:

Bushwhackers just left Parkville. Captain Ford and Lieutenant Nash with the Paw Paws, on duty at Parkville, surrendered without firing a gun and then went with them to fight the radicals. Say they were forced to do so. Claimed to have 300. Took direction to Platte City. Help the Kansas men over there without delay. Say they will burn Parkville in a day or two. Colonel Park, at Wyandotte, will answer questions.

THOS. J. WILSON,

Captain Company E, Eighty-second Regiment Enrolled Mo. Militia.

FORT LEAVENWORTH, July 11, 1864.

Captain W. D. McLAIN,

Lawrence:

You are not threatened. Troubles are on the other side the Missouri. I am only making ready for probable movements. Keep the troops always ready, however. My engineer will go over and lay out a fort. Probably leave here to-morrow.

S. R. CURTIS,

Major-General.

Telegrapher: Directs the operator of Weston to keep open all night; also at Wyandotte and Olathe.

S. R. CURTIS,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF NORTH KANSAS,

For Leavenworth, July 11, 1864.

Colonel E. D. TOWNSEND,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

SIR: I have the honor to call the attention of the honorable the Secretary of War to the fact that much of the territory which is held by our military forces is infested with bushwhackers, marauders, and thieves, depredating upon the lives and property of loyal citizens. They are mostly persons acting contrary to the laws of war, and in concert with rebel sympathizers who have taken the oath of allegiance, and from this fact are entitled to remain within our lines. Their concert of action is of such a nature that they cannot be detected and brought to justice by law, yet are completely successful in destroying Union men and their property, thereby in portions of the country have almost effectually crushed out the Union element, while they are left prosperous and intact in life and property; while Union men are compelled to flee from their homes to save life before the agents of these quasi-loyal men, they are enabled by such means to carry on a more successful warfare, by reason of their protection, than they could do if they were open enemies. union men vainly call for protection from the military, and the impossibility of giving such protection to all is gradually disheartening and discouraging them. They are mostly ready to serve under arms, but to kill a bushwhacker or sympathizer is either to be banished from their homes or to cost them their lives.