War of the Rebellion: Serial 084 Page 0100 LOUISIANA AND THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI. Chapter LIII.

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here. I suppose because the citizens do not know every more that I make, they think there is nothing doing, which I think is best to keep from them. I shall proceed to carry out your instructions to the letter.

Sir, I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JACKSON BALL,

Captain, Commanding Company L, Sixth Enrolled Missouri Militia.

SAINT JOSEPH, July 9, 1864.

General FISK,

Glasgow, Mo.:

Nothing further from the bushwhackers. Major Clark assures me that he is mustering for a conflict. Mayor Beller and the radicals are undoubtedly frightened, more or less. General Curtis informs us that he has sent sufficient force to protect Weston for a day or two, until matters are quieted. The Clay County committee make apologies for delays, and state that their plans have been thwarted by the movement of the troops contrary to agreement. I go to Weston this evening.

G. A. HOLLOWAY,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

SAINT JOSEPH, July 9, 1864.

Brigadier-General FISK,

Glasgow, Mo.:

I have just returned from Weston, where I found about 250 men, sent there by General Curtis at my request. Shall ask to have all but 100 relieved after to-morrow. General Craig is going down Monday to organize companies under Order 107. Mayor Beller reports that many obstacles are in the way of a speedy organization of the citizens of Weston. They prefer quarreling instead of militia duty. I assured him they must work rapidly, for we should recall the troops now stationed there within a day or two. Whisky shops were running under the highest kind of pressure, and very many of the people excited. I advised all parties of close up the shops and disperse from the streets. The shops were closed. The gang of guerrillas under Taylor, numbering about 150, were in Goose Neck to-day. Major Clark at Platte city defending the town with what Paw paws he has. He has no faith in them, apparently, and dare not move from that place. If Colonel Draper could use his command and Kemper's on the rascals they might be persuaded to leave the county, otherwise they will take their own time. I do not think you can count anything on the Platte County militia. General Craig and Colonel Bassett are organizing the Saint Joseph militia to-day, but with what success I am unable to say. I think they will not get many recruits. Colonel Greene sends the following dispatch:

The general commanding is of the opinion that Glasgow, is the present condition of affairs, is the natural headquarters of your district, unless you should be of a decidedly opposed opinion. You will please take the necessary steps to effect the removal. Please report your opinion and action.

O. D. GREENE,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

G. A. HOLLOWAY,

Assistant Adjutant-General.