War of the Rebellion: Serial 084 Page 0097 Chapter LIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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of the road is under charge of Colonel Mizner I did not suppose it necessary for me to make reports for him. I am also informed that the road was torn up last night six miles from the Bluff. If I am to guard the whole line of the road I respectfully ask that another regiment be sent to me as soon as possible. I am now guarding thirty-two miles with 350 men, and my men are on duty day and night. The Sixty-first Illinois are moving their camp to Devall's Bluff, leaving no troops on the road except my own regiment.

O. WOOD,

Colonel.

CAMP OF SCOUTING PARTY TENTH ILLINOIS CAV.,

Bayou Des Arc, Ark., July 9, 1864.

GENERAL COMMANDING DISTRICT:

GENERAL: I arrived here at 6 o'clock this evening. Find all quiet. Shall move from here for Searcy at 4 a. m. to-morrow.

Respectfully,

D. H. WILSON,

Captain, Tenth Illinois Cavalry, Commanding Scout.

HUNTSVILLE, July 9, 1864.

(Received 9.30 a. m.)

Captain C. H. DYER:

A citizen came in and reported a party of fifteen rebels twenty-five miles north of this place yesterday. I sent a scout of one lieutenant and twenty men to the place last night with orders to attack them.

JAMES STUART,

Colonel, Commanding Post.

LITTLE ROCK, July 9, 1864.

(Received 10 a. m.)

Colonel P. CLAYTON,

Pine Bluff:

COLONEL: General Marcy, inspector-general, left this morning for your post. Grant demanded the unconditional surrender of Petersburg on the 4th. When the steamer left on reply had been received, but the place would be assaulted if they declined to surrender. A force of 6,000 cavalry, probably under F. Lee, was making a raid into Pennsylvania and Maryland. Sigel had stopped them at Maryland Heights, and they were being surrounded by our troops. This all comes by telegraph to Fort Smith from Saint Louis, 5th, and is reliable.

F. STEELE,

Major-General.

PINE BLUFF, ARK., July 9, 1864-9 p. m.

Major-General STEELE:

The reconnoitering party sent down the river has returned. They went as far as Arkansas Post, on the north side of the river. They returned by the way of Brownsville, being compelled to make the de-

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