War of the Rebellion: Serial 084 Page 0038 LOUISIANA AND THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI. Chapter LIII.

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SPECIAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. DISTRICT OF THE FRONTIER, Numbers 91.

Fort Smith, Ark., July 3, 1864.

I. Colonel W. R. Judson is hereby assigned to the command of the Third Brigade, Frontier Division, Seventh Army Corps.

* * * * * *

By command of Brigadier General J. M. Thayer:

T. J. ANDERSON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

SAINT JOSEPH, July 3, 1864.

Major General W. S. ROSECRANS:

Lieutenant-Colonel Caldwell with 150 men is after Bill Anderson to-day from Macon. I have 500 men scouting through Chariton and Randolph to Allen. Lieutenant-Colonel Caldwell's detachment will join General Douglass as soon as the chase after Anderson is over. I am now concentrating the Ninth Cavalry Missouri State Militia, under Colonel Draper, to take the field without baggage or subsistence, and follow Anderson's gang day and night until the villains are exterminated. The people in Randolph, Howard, and Boone have exhibited such apathy in responding to your earnest appeal to help themselves that they really deserve [sic] to some extent. Colonel Catherwood has his hands full in Clay.

CLINTON B. FISK,

Brigadier-General.

SAINT JOSEPH, July 3, 1864.

Colonel O. D. GREENE,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

Is it probable that I will be relieved from this command and receive the leave of absence requested in my telegram of the 28th ultimo?

CLINTON B. FISK,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF MINNESOTA, DEPARTMENT OF THE NORTHWEST,

Saint Paul, Minn., July 3, 1864.

Lieutenant Colonel W. L. DUFF,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Present:

COLONEL: That you may be correctly informed of the state of matters connected with the Indian war on the frontiers of Minnesota, Iowa, and Territory of Dakota, I beg leave to submit, very briefly, the following facts:

First. Shortly after the Sioux outbreak of 1862 on the borders of this State, which was attended with untold horrors, and the massacre of nearly 800 white men, women, and children, I was placed in command of the raw levies hastily thrown forward to check the savages. The battle of Wood Lake, a locality sixty or seventy miles above Fort Ridgely, resulted in the total defeat of the concentrated force of the bands concerned in the outrages. About 2,000 prisoners of Indian men, women, and children were taken, of whom upward of 300 of the former were tried by a military commission appointed by me, found