War of the Rebellion: Serial 082 Page 0784 OPERATIONS IN SE.VA. AND N.C. Chapter LII.

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rain continues until a flood or good rise is produced in the James River, 1,000 men with axes could, in a few days, cut from the banks of that river and float together trees enough to sweep the Yankee fleet out into the Atlantic Ocean, and leave Grant's army without pontoons, communications, or base of supplies, and without the support of gun-boats, perhaps we might drive his army into the river. The freshest in the James River are, I understand, powerful in volume of water and swiftness of current; the trees cut and floated together before a rise could be strongly united, forming almost a solid mass, and no power or Yankee ingenuity could withstand the crushing power of this raft, hurled down the stream by the accumulated torrents of the river.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. JOHNSON,

Major-General.

CAMP ENGINEER TROOPS, Blandford, July 19, 1864.

Colonel W. H. STEVENS, Chief Engineer, &c.:

COLONEL: At Colquitt's salient the gallery was extended up to 8 p.m. on the 18th a distance of 7 feet 6 inches, and by the night detachment an additional distance of 2 feet 9 inches, a distance of 10 feet 3 inches for the day's work, and a total distance of 45 feet 6 inches from the entrance. In consequence of the accumulation of the earth during the day which had to be removed at night, the night detachment made less progress in the execution of the gallery. I hope after to-day to be able to increase the strength of the detachments from the fifty additional men ordered to report by Major-General Johnson, so that the work in the gallery can be carried on at night without any delay. I experimented last night in this gallery with an auger in boring; used a 2-inch auger; found it answered an excellent purpose; had an iron scraper prepared to clean out the hole and will continue to test the presence of the enemy by the use of the auger and will also introduce the same in the galleries at Pegram's salient. I have had a wheel-barrow made and used it at Colquitt's gallery last night; will have others made to-day for the mines at Pegram's; find they are much more convenient than baskets or handbarrows. At Pegram's salient, No. 1, extended 3 feet up to 8 p.m. on the 18th, and by the night detachment an additional distance of 4 feet, a distance of 7 feet for the day's work, and a total distance of 46 feet from the entrance. At mine Numbers 2 worked only half reliefs, the detachments not being full; made for the day's work 2 feet 2 inches, a total distance of 37 feet 10 inches. A total distance for the day's work was made at all the mines of 19 feet 5 inches.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

HUGH THOS. DOUGLAS,

Captain, Commanding Engineer Troops, in Charge Mining, &c.

CAMP ENGINEER TROOPS, Blandford, July 19, 1864.

Colonel W. H. STEVENS,

Chief Engineer, &c.:

COLONEL: I would respectfully ask that whisky rations be furnished to the men under my command engaged in mining operations. These