War of the Rebellion: Serial 082 Page 0762 OPERATIONS IN SE.VA.AND N.C. Chapter LII.

Search Civil War Official Records

Abstract from field return of the Army of Northern Virginia, &c.-Continued.

Present for duty

Command Office Men Aggrega Aggrega Aggrega

rs te te te

present present present

and and

absent absent

Third Army Corps, 17 - 17 17 17

Lieutenant General

A. P. Hill

Anderson's 510 5,567 7,569 14,380 6,643

division

Heth's division 485 5,276 6,288 14,001 6,121

Wilcox's division 410 4,410 5,581 12,190 5,445

Total 1,422 15,253 19,455 40,588 18,226

Cavalry Corps: 217 2,888 3,570 8,967 -

Hampton's division

Fitz. Lee's 134 1,591 1,994 5,889 1,928

division

W. H. F. Lee's 247 3,957 4,929 8,324 3,379

division

Total 598 8,436 10,493 23,180 5,307

Artillery, 54 953 1,180 1,622 1,247

Brigadier General

W. N.

Pendleton: General

Beauregard's

command

First Army Corps 76 1,624 1,919 2,637 1,838

Second Army Corps 34 610 818 1,701 817

a

Third Army Corps 112 2,106 2,555 3,475 2,519

Total 276 5,293 6,472 9,435 6,421

Grand total 4,439 53,024 68,844 135,805 62,571

a Part with General Early not reported.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA, July 11, 1864.

His Excellency JEFFERSON DAVIS,

President of the Confederate States:

Mr. PRESIDENT: As far as can be ascertained from information received from deserters, prisoners, scouts, and citizens the force that I mentioned in my letter of the 7th instant as having left General Grant's army, consisted of Ricketts' division, of the Sixth Corps. The same night about a brigade of cavalry, as I think, without their horses also went down the James. No other troops left Grant's army as far as I can learn until yesterday, when, it is reported by scouts on James River, sixteen transports loaded with troops, their arms, and knapsacks, in many instances plainly visible, descended the river. The reports received render it probable that the remainder of the Sixth Corps has gone. I send a special messenger to General Early with this information, and such suggestions as to his future movements as seem to be proper. I inclose a letter* received from him to-day by the messenger first sent, from which you will learn his progress and purpose. I had hoped that General Grant, rather than weaken his army, would have attempted to drive us from our position. I fear I shall not

---------------

*Not found.

---------------