War of the Rebellion: Serial 082 Page 0719 Chapter LII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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have that many ready to start to me the instant I telegraph for them? If you can at the same time send horses for the guns it would be best. I do not like to venture my battery horses, for we may be called on to use them at a moment's notice. Please let your quartermaster, if you can, send horses and wagons in case they are wanted.

A. PIPER,

Colonel and Chief of Artillery.

BROADWAY LANDING, VA., July 31, 1864-12 m.

Colonel PIPER,

Chief of Artillery, Eighteenth Corps:

I will keep eleven wagons and three teams constantly ready for Captain Dow's material, subject to your telegram. I shall also have other transportation generally in part for the rest, or part of it, and can always inform you of the amount. I think Captain Dow's mantlets had better be sent back. I will send for them if desired.

HENRY L. ABBOT,

Colonel First Connecticut Artillery.

BROADWAY LANDING, VA., July 31, 1864-9.30 a.m.

Captain BROOKER,

Commanding Siege Battery near Warren's Headquarters:

(Through his Telegraph Operator).

Captain Pierce must gouge out the fuse plugs of his filled shells in some way, if possible. Only abandon and bury them as a last resort. By careful cutting I think he may safely try it.

HENRY L. ABBOT,

Colonel First Connecticut Artillery.

BROADWAY LANDING, VA., July 31, 1864-9.30 a.m.

Captain BROOKER:

Tell Captain Pierce to bore out his fuse composition and fill his shells with water as one resort, better than leaving them.

H. L. ABBOT,

Colonel First Connecticut Artillery.

BROADWAY LANDING, VA., July 31, 1864-9.45 a.m.

Captain EDSON,

Ordnance Officer at Fort Monroe:

Pleaser retain all ammunition coming to Fort Monroe for my train (except Coehorn mortar) until hearing from me again.

HENRY L. ABBOT,

Colonel First Connecticut Artillery, Commanding.