War of the Rebellion: Serial 082 Page 0706 OPERATIONS IN SE. VA. AND N. C. Chapter LII.

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the latter part of the dispatch, and again reminds you that he has received no report whatever from you of what occurred after 11 a.m. yesterday.

A. A. HUMPHREYS,

Major-General and Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

July 31, 1864-8.40 p.m.

General BURNSIDE:

The commanding general directs me to inquire when he may expect the return of casualties in your command in the engagement of yesterday. He has seen your dispatch to General Humphreys giving the aggregate of the casualties, but he desires to have a statement showing the killed, wounded, and missing, distinguishing under each head between the officers and enlisted men.

S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS NINTH ARMY CORPS,

July 31, 1864-9 p.m.

General WILLIAMS:

We are in process of relieving the troops on our line not belonging to this corps as also Cutler's division, of the Fifth Army Corps. All is comparatively quiet on my front. The flag of truce was withdrawn in accordance with the directions of the general commanding and arrangements made by which in the event of an answer from General Lee being in readiness communication can be opened with us.

A. E. BURNSIDE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS NINTH ARMY CORPS,

July 31, 1864. (Received 9.10 p.m.)

Major-General HUMPHREYS,

Chief of Staff:

Your dispatch of 7.20 p.m. received. Just before the order for withdrawal was sent into the brigade commanders in the crater the enemy made an attack upon our forces there and were repulsed with very severe loss to the assaulting column. The order for withdrawal, leaving the time and manner of the execution thereof to the brigade commanders on the spot, was then sent in, and while they were making arrangements to carry out the order the enemy advanced another column of attack. The officers knowing they were not to be supported by other troops, and that a withdrawal was determined, ordered the men to retire at once to our old line. It was in this withdrawal and consequent upon it that our chief loss was made. In view of the want of confidence in their situation, and the certainty of no support consequent upon the receipt of such an order, of whose moral effects the general commanding cannot be ignorant, I am at a loss to know why the latter part of my dispatch requires explanation.

A. E. BURNSIDE,

Major-General.