War of the Rebellion: Serial 082 Page 0690 OPERATIONS IN SE. VA. AND N. C. Chapter LII.

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JULY 30, 1864-12.10 p. m.

The provost-marshal at Norfolk will call on Judge Snead and request him to come with the provost-marshal to visit me at the front on a special boat to be sent up by Colonel Biggs for that purpose. If Judge Snead declines to come, then the provost-marshal will bring Judge Snead to me with as much gentleness as is consistent with his prompt coming. Judge Snead will start at once. Acknowledge receipt.

BENJ. F. BUTLER,

Major-General, Commanding.

WASHINGTON, July 31, 1864-11.30 a. m.

Lieutenant-General GRANT,

City Point, Va.:

Will the division of cavalry come armed, mounted, and ready for the field, or must they be mounted and fitted out here?

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General and Chief of Staff.

WASHINGTON, July 31, 1864-3 p. m.

Lieutenant-General GRANT,

City Point, Va.:

It appears from General Averell's reports that while General Hunter was collecting his forces at Harper's Ferry to attack the enemy on the south side the rebel army crossed on the morning of the 29th near Williamsport, and moved, by Hagerstown, into Pennsylvania. Their cavalry captured and partly destroyed Chambersburg yesterday. We have no reliable information of the main body, but, if it crossed and moved as reported by Averell, it would be nearer Baltimore, Harrisburg, and York than Hunter was at Harper's Ferry. I consequently directed him to move east of South Mountain toward Emmitsburg, and sent last night, by railroad, to the Monocacy such of Emory's command as had arrived, where he would come immediately under Hunter's orders. They will probably effect a junction to-night. The weather is so intensely hot that marches will be very slow. It is possible that the enemy's infantry is merely covering his cavalry raid. Enemy's cavalry force said to be very large. Ours is so weak and poor that it gives us very little information. A very intelligent artificer of the Sixth Corps, captured at the battle of Monocacy, and who effected his escape in the Shenandoah Valley, has just come in. He says he had several good opportunities to estimate Early's force and actually counted forty-two pieces of artillery open their retreat, and thinks that, as compared with our army corps, which he has frequently seen on reviews, they numbered at least 30,000. He thinks there were two brigades of Hill's corps with Early. I do not hear that Early received any large re-enforcements in the Valley, but it is said be greatly increased his cavalry by remounts, stolen in Maryland.

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General and Chief of Staff.