War of the Rebellion: Serial 082 Page 0615 Chapter LII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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Landing, about 400 yards below the lower pontoon bridge, there is an old wharf which needs but a little labor to make it useful for landing forage, there being lumber at the landing. As the general spoke of a landing on that, the north, side of the river being preferable, I send this information, thinking it may be of service, particularly as they, the officers, say there is a good wagon road leading directly to it. I shall hurry the forage up as rapidly as possible.

ARCHER N. MARTIN,

Captain and Aide-de-Camp.

HDQRS. CAVALRY CORPS, ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, July 29, 1864.

Brigadier-General GREGG,

Commanding Second Cavalry Division:

The general desires that you keep all your artillery on this side of the river and put it in position.

Very respectfully,

JAS. W. FORSYTH,

Lieutenant-Colonel.

HDQRS. CAVALRY CORPS, ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

July 29, 1864 - 12.50 p. m.

Brigadier-General GREGG,

Commanding Second Cavalry Division:

GENERAL: There is forage at the first wharf below the pontoon bridge for the brigade of your command that is on this side of the river. The general commanding desires that you send for it as soon as General Torbert has drawn for his command.

E. B. PARSONS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, July 29, 1864 - 10 a. m.

Brigadier-General WILSON,

Commanding Third Division Cavalry:

The major-general commanding directs that you concentrate your division on the left, somewhere near the plank road, and hold its available force ready for prompt movement. The guard left with trains should be merely sufficient to protect them against any small irregular parties of the enemy. The dismounted men should form this guard. Please report your location as soon as you are established.

A. A. HUMPHREYS,

Major-General and Chief of Staff.

P. S. 0- The patrols and pickets on the north side of the Blackwater should be reduced to the minimum confident with watching the main avenues of approach.

A. A. H.