War of the Rebellion: Serial 082 Page 0599 Chapter LII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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CITY POINT, July 29, 1864.

General HANCOCK:

Has the enemy made any development to-day? If not, it will be well to attract his attention. I would not attack, but would keep up the idea of doing so to prevent the withdrawal of the enemy.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

HEADQUARTERS SECOND CORPS, July 29, 1864-12.45 p.m.

Lieutenant-General GRANT:

The enemy are strengthening their work this morning, and have been working all night. They are strengthening their works across all the direct roads to Richmond, according to the reports of all the vedettes. Last night I sent out a division of cavalry to get rid of their horses. General Sheridan has them concealed along the bank of James River. The division dismounted returned after daylight, giving the appearance to the enemy that we were strongly re-enforced. The enemy could see the whole movement plainly. The movement of the horses was made during the night. We hold the same ground with our pickets that the fights were on yesterday. I have already sent cavalry our on all the roads this morning, and will do as you suggest, without making an attack. No movement of troops has been observed this morning.

WINF'D S. HANCOCK,

Major-General.

(Same to General Meade.)

HEADQUARTERS SECOND ARMY CORPS, July 29, 1864-3 p.m.

Lieutenant-General GRANT:

I respectfully suggest that, if practicable, it would be well to have another bridge thrown here for use to-night. A deserter from Kershaw's division, just in, reports that division as engaged in intrenching in front, near the Jennings house probably.

WINF'D S. HANCOCK,

Major-General.

The above just received, and General Butler has been requested to comply with the request, if practicable.

JOHN A. RAWLINS,

Brigadier-General, &c.

HEADQUARTERS SECOND CORPS, July 29, 1864-4.40 p.m.

General MEADE:

The enemy on the Central (or Darby) road have struck their tents and are standing at arms in their pits, so the pickets report. The vedettes also say that they are moving to my right. I think this is only preparation in fear of an attack, as I moved a large force of my cavalry across the open ground only, in full view, toward Malvern Hill to demonstrate an attack. Some time since I ordered their pickets driven in on the Central road in order to see farther. I have had no reply. On my