War of the Rebellion: Serial 082 Page 0585 Chapter LII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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a late hour last night, and he said he thought he should advance this morning, and he would let me know when he did, and I was to make a demonstration at the same time on this side. I have had my troops under arms and ready since 3 a.m., but have heard no firing or no notice of an advance from General Hancock. The enemy's line is so short that unless the demonstration was made at the same time as that of General Hancock I could use but a small portion of my force, as an advance on my part would leave my camp exposed, and I should have to leave a strong force in it. I am all ready and will make a vigorous push when the forces below the creek attack. Did I do right?

Respectfully, yours,

R. S. FOSTER,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS TENTH ARMY CORPS, July 28, 1864.

General FOSTER:

Make demonstration but hold troops well in hand to secure your works. I presume General Hancock will make a real full attack in his front. How is this?

D. B. BIRNEY,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS TENTH ARMY CORPS, July 28, 1864.

Brigadier-General FOSTER,

Deep Bottom:

I ordered General Birge to cross pontoon bridge before daylight and report to Major-General Hancock. Two of his regiments have been left here without guide and contrary to orders express and explicit. I have sent then down. Send a staff officer to find General Birge, probably at General Hancock's or near there with the portion of his brigade, and give him this.

D. B. BIRNEY,

Major-General, Commanding.

GENERAL FOSTER'S HEADQUARTERS, July 28, 1864.

Major-General BIRNEY:

I have the honor to forward copy of a communication received from Brigadier-General Birge in answer to your dispatch.

Respectfully,

R. S. FOSTER,

Brigadier-General.

[Inclosure.]

[JULY 28, 1864.]

General FOSTER:

General Birney is mistaken. I reported to General Hancock with my command at the bridge at 5.30 a.m. The two regiments were fifteen minutes in rear of the rest, being detached from the brigade when the order was received. The distance to the bridge was three miles farther than General Birney's staff officer told me it was. I left a guide,