War of the Rebellion: Serial 082 Page 0571 Chapter LII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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200 yards from 16-foot water to 16-foot water across the gap. The land is but 30 feet high as an average, and we should have for a 50-foot cut but about 55,000 cubic feet of excavation, or ten days' labor for 1,000 men. By that means our iron-clads could get out and Howlett would be useless. If you will look upon the map you will get my idea at once. I have made my examination by the Coast Survey map. I should not depend on the current to do any part of the cutting, as at Vicksburg although it might help. The gun-boats cover the place.

Respectfully,

BENJ. F. BUTLER,

Major-General, Commanding.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA,

In the Field, July 28, 1864. (Received 9 a.m.)

Lieutenant General U. S. GRANT,

City Point:

Since daylight about seventy-five wagons and ambulances, about 100 stragglers, and a drove of cattle and mules have crossed Chaffin's farm, going east. One of the rebel rams has moved down the river a short distance. Trains were running frequently on the road during the night.

Respectfully,

BENJ. F. BUTLER,

Major-General, Commanding.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA,

In the Field, July 28, 1864-9.30 a.m.

Lieutenant General U. S. GRANT,

City Point:

Signal officer at Spring Hill reports that two trains passed toward Richmond, one at 12 midnight and the other at 3.30 a.m. Signal officer on the high tower reports a train of twenty-seven empty cars passed to Petersburg at 7.45 a.m. It is unusual for trains to be passing over the railroad at night.

Respectfully,

BENJ. F. BUTLER,

Major-General, Commanding.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA,

In the Field, July 28, 1864-10 a.m.

Lieutenant General U. S. GRANT,

City Point:

A train of twenty-seven wagons passed up turnpike to Richmond at 9.30 a.m.

Respectfully,

BENJ. F. BUTLER,

Major-General.