War of the Rebellion: Serial 082 Page 0553 Chapter LII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.- UNION.

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CITY POINT, VA. July 28, 1864-11.30 a.m.

Major-General MEADE:

Bringing Hancock back to-night, his corps will be too much fatigued for active operations in the morning. He can, however, hold the ground of the Eighteenth Corps and leave that to say on this subject and then make the necessary orders. Do you think the necessary preparations can be made for an assault in the morning?

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC.

July 28, 1864-12 m.

Lieutenant-General GRANT:

Your dispatch of 11.30 received. An assault cannot be made to-morrow, as you suggest, because there will not be time in the night to withdraw Hancock and relieve the Eighteenth Corps. That being the case, I would suggest Hancock being withdrawn to-night and massed in Burnside's rear to-morrow. This will give him the necessary rest, and it could then be determined about assaulting the next morning with the Ninth and Second or Eighteenth, as you may desire, adding the available reserves of the corps in line. The assault might, perhaps, be made to-morrow evening. It could only be made to-morrow morning by putting in the Second Corps, and they would hardly reach the scene of action till after daylight.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMIES OF THE UNITED STATES,

City Point, Va., July 28, 1864-12.20 p.m.

Major-General MEADE,

Army of the Potomac:

Your dispatch of 12 m. received. Unless something turns up north of the James between this and night that I do not expect, you may withdraw Hancock to be followed by Sheridan, and make arrangements for assault as soon as it can be made. We can determine by the movements of the enemy before the time comes whether it will be advisable to go on with the assault. I would put in the Eighteenth Corps or not, as you deem best.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC.

July 28, 1864-1 p.m.

Lieutenant-General GRANT:

Your dispatch of 12.20 received. On reflection, I think daylight of the 30th is the earliest time it would be advisable to make the assault. Besides the time required to get up heavy guns and mortars we require the night to make certain preliminary arrangements, such as moving troops, removing abatis from the debouche of the assaulting columns, &c. I shall make the assault with the Ninth Corps, supported by the