War of the Rebellion: Serial 082 Page 0520 OPERATIONS IN SE. VA. AND N. C. Chapter LII.

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plank road in is entirely unfounded. That be being so, as the siege-works going on are chiefly those for the secure approach to the batteries, the commanding general thinks they might be continued.

A. A. HUMPHREYS,

Major-General and Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS FIFTH ARMY CORPS,

July 27, 1864-4 p. m.

General HUMPHREYS:

I transmit the following:

PICKET-LINE THIRD DIVISION,

[July 27, 1864] - 3.10 p. m.

General WARREN,

Commanding Fifth Corps:

GENERAL: The enemy having evacuated that part of their entrenchments east of the railroad near and east of the lead-works, the tents in that portion of the line were struck last night, and there is now no sign of occupation of that part of his works. Tents have been erected inside of the new fort east of the woods opposite the angle of my line. The officer in charge of the post at that point reports that be saw three trains just before sundown on the road near the vacated breast-works, and that they were running all night, and that there was great noise and commotion. It is no doubt the fact that that portion of Hill's corps (Heth's) which occupied the enemy's works a adjoining the railroad have left. The enemy's line at other points appears unchanged. A new camp adjoins the new fort.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. W. CRAWFORD,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

Respectfully,

G. K. WARREN,

Major-General of Volunteers.

HEADQUARTERS FIFTH ARMY CORPS,

July 27, 1864.

Brigadier General S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

GENERAL: There is one point in the transfer of Ray Stone's brigade from General Cutler's division to General Griffin's which controlled my action, but which is nevertheless so delicate a one that I have left it out of my previous communications. General Cutler makes a point of this transfer, but I did it because this this brigade had not sustained its former good reputation, and its apologists laid the blame on General Cutler. I transferred it and assigned Colonel Chamberlain to the command, an officer of the highest reputation. In our next engagement Colonel Chamberlain was wounded and I have no report of its conduct on that occasion. I have kept up four divisions thus far as ordered, and always assigned the officers as I found them, on being assigned myself, according to their rank. My relation to each has, as far as I know, been harmonious, and I have forborne to state things which might not effect a positive change in position, and yet engender unpleasant relations. I wish the commanding general to be informed of the reason for my action with Ray Stone's brigade, and have no objection to General Cutler's knowing it, if it is necessary, or an act of injustice to him to withhold it.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. K. WARREN,

Major-General of Volunteers.