War of the Rebellion: Serial 082 Page 0515 Chapter LII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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suggested to the lieutenant-general commanding that you be re-enforced by any troops General Butler may have to spare, so as to make the most vigorous effort possible to-morrow to drive back the enemy. His answer not yet received.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

DEEP BOTTOM, July 27, 1864-10 p. m.

Major-General MEADE:

Your dispatch is received.

WINF'D S. HANCOCK,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

July 27, 1864-10 p. m. (Received 10.15 p. m.)

General HANCOCK:

It appears General Butler has but few troops to spare. All he can dispense with General Grant says will be sent you, and Foster will be directed to operate on your left flank. You must do the best you can with what you have got.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

July 27, 1864-10.30 p. m.

Major-General HANCOCK:

The following forwarded for your information:

CITY POINT, July 27, 1864.

Major-General MEADE:

General Butler will send General Hancock a brigade 2,900 strong. They will commence crossing soon after daylight, so that Hancock can count on their assistance.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

DEPARTMENT HEADQUARTERS,

July 27, 1864. (Received 11.15 p. m.)

Major-General HANCOCK:

General Birge with his brigade, of the Nineteenth Corps, 2,900 men, has been ordered to cross the pontoon bridge at daylight to report to you. General Foster has been ordered to make as vigorous demonstrations as are possible in consistency with the safety of his position on the upper side of Four-Mile Creek, so as to divert, if possible, an equal force of the enemy.

Respectfully,

G. WEITZEL,

Brigadier-General and Acting Chief of Staff.