War of the Rebellion: Serial 082 Page 0504 OPERATIONS IN SE. VA. AND N. C. Chapter LII.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

July 27, 1864- 8 p. m.

Lieutenant-General GRANT:

I forward two dispatches* just received from General Hancock, which will explain themselves. General Hancock asks for instructions, which request is respectfully referred to you. My own opinion from the result of the day's operations and General Hancock's reports is that nothing will be accomplished by his longer continuance across the James. I have no report from General Sheridan and can form no judgment as to the expediency of his going farther.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMIES OF THE UNITED STATES,

City Point, Va., July 27, 1864-8.10 p. m.

(Received 8.50 p. m.0

Major-General MEADE,

Army of the Potomac:

The enemy only commenced about two hours ago re-enforcing Richmond from Petersburg. Twenty-nine car-loads of troops have been seen to pass the Junction within that time. This will make any surprise impossible, and may prevent our cavalry reaching the railroad. I will have this dispatch repeated to General Hancock and let him do what he can in the morning in the way of turning the enemy and driving from his present position. After that he will be best able to determine whether it will be well to push farther.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

(Copy to General Hancock.)

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

July 27, 1864-9 p. m.

Lieutenant-General GRANT:

I should judge from Hancock's dispatches that he does not consider himself in sufficient force to effect much. Can you not re-enforce him from some of Major-General Butler's troops? I make this suggestion because the stronger he is the more powerful the blow he can strike to-morrow.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

CITY POINT, VA., July 27, 1864.

Major-General MEADE,

Commanding, &c.:

General Butler's sending off the Nineteenth Corps leaves him very weak, so that I do not think he can re-enforce Hancock much. I will direct him, however, to send all the troops he can possibly spare. General Foster now has about 2,700 men at Deep Bottom, just in position to strike the enemy in flank if he is driven back.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

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*See Hancock to Meade, 4 p. m. and 6 p. m., pp.512, 514.

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