War of the Rebellion: Serial 082 Page 0495 Chapter LII. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.-UNION.

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HDQRS. THIRD Brigadier, FIRST DIV., TENTH ARMY CORPS, Deep Bottom,

July 26, 1864-8.40 a.m.

Major General D. B. BIRNEY,

Commanding Tenth Army Corps:

Your dispatch received. Owing to the shameful conduct of a portion of the brigade of the Nineteenth Army Corps here, who feel back to the entrenchments at a slight skirmish fire of not more than fifty shots, I lost the crest. I have sent the Eleventh Maine and Tenth Connecticut from my brigade on this side to try and retake as much as possible of the line, and have thereby weakened my own line. I can place no reliance in the brigade of the Nineteenth Corps under my orders.

Respectfully, yours,

R. S. FOSTER,

Brigadier-General.

JONES' NECK, July 26, 1864.

General WEITZEL:

Colonel Currie is as much annoyed at the conduct of his troops as myself. Thirtieth Maine were not on the picket-line. It was two New York regiments. They had the most explicit instructions from Colonel Currie, who even went so far as to tell them if they broke the troops in the rear had orders to fire on them. As near as I can learn about twenty men were captured; only one killed and one wounded. I have got two regiments there now that get all they can, if possible, hold all they get.

R. S. FOSTER,

Brigadier-General.

JONES' NECK, July 26, 1864.

Brigadier-General WEITZEL:

Cannot you send me some more pick-axes? The ground where we are at work is very hard and requires almost as many picks as shovels.

R. S. FOSTER,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS, July 26, 1864.

Brigadier-General FOSTER,

Jones' Neck:

I have ordered 100 picks to be sent you. I regret to hear what you communicate. It is of the highest importance to get that line back only for eighteen hours from now. I am surprised to hear about the conduct of those Nineteenth Corps troops. I don't know any troops available that would be better now. Those troops you have have been in as hot places, have fought as gallantly as any troops in the army. Colonel Currie, their commander, bears three honorable wounds, and is promoted for gallantry. He was Major-General Smith's adjutant-general all through the campaigns of the Army of the Potomac. They have never fought a picket-line. Had they proper instructions to fight in a picket-line?

G. WEITZEL,

Brigadier-General and Acting Chief of Staff.