War of the Rebellion: Serial 082 Page 0489 Chapter LII. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.-UNION.

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telegraphed to to use all possible dispatch in pushing forward the ammunition wanted. The large amount of these orders, in addition to the current wants of the service, entails a heavy draught on the Department, especially as it is dependent on private parties entirely for its supply of projectiles; yet everything possible will be done to sustain your operations in this respect. In future please make your requisitions on the regular blank forms and inclose it in your letter of explanation, as this mode facilitates issues and is very convenient for making references when necessary.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. D. RAMSAY,

Brigadier-General and Chief of Ordnance.

BROADWAY LANDING, VA., July 26, 1864.

Brigadier General GEORGE D. RAMSAY,

Chief of Ordnance, U. S. Army,

Winder Building, Washington, D. C.:

I have on hand at present the following ordnance stores, none having been received since the arrival of the siege train: 962 barrels mortar powder, 287 barrels cannon powder, 143 barrels musket powder, 6,000 10-inch mortar fuses, 1,500 8-inch mortar fuses.

HENRY L. ABBOT,

Colonel First Connecticut Artillery, Commanding Siege Train.

JULY 26, 1864.

Major-General BIRNEY,

Commanding Tenth Corps:

GENERAL: Hancock and Sheridan are going out to-night, commencing at dark, by the two brigades at General Foster's front. They go toward Richmond. It is to be a sort of surprise and raid. This might bring on an attack on the line in our immediate front, and I have therefore ordered up the parts of two brigades of the Nineteenth Corps from Bermuda Hundred to encamp to the left and front of your headquarters and out of sight of the enemy. They will be ordered to report to you if an attack is made. They number together about 2,400.

Respectfully,

G. WEITZEL,

Brigadier-General and Acting Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS TENTH ARMY CORPS, July 26, 1864.

Brigadier-General WEITZEL:

The enemy drove in Foster's picket-line on the right below the creek. He will and retake it. He reports that the Nineteenth Corps men behave very badly, and add nothing to his strength; that they cannot be relied on in any way. Cannot General Turner be relieved, so as to rejoin the command and give me some reliable troops. I will visit Deep Bottom during the morning.

D. B. BIRNEY,

Major-General.