War of the Rebellion: Serial 082 Page 0451 Chapter LII. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.-UNION.

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CITY POINT, VA., July 25, 1864-9.15 p.m.

Major-General BUTLER,

Commanding,&c.:

The concentration of the enemy between the Appomattox and James may result in an attack on your lines. Have you got all your force at or near the front? I saw a large vessel arrive at Bermuda to-day loaded with troops. Are these from New Orleans?

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA, July 25, 1864-9.15 p.m.

I don't think the concentration of troops between the Appomattox and the James means an attack upon me. I think from the point where the enemy's forces are put that it means to repel an advance upon Port Walthall Junction. They are in a convenient position as a reserve a either against an attack upon Petersburg or from my lines. About 1,300 men arrived to-day from New Orleans. They are a portion of the Second Brigade, Second Division, Nineteenth Army Corps.

BENJ. F. BUTLER,

Major-General, Commanding.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA, July 25, 1864-10 p.m.

Lieutenant General U. S. GRANT,

Commanding,&c., City Point:

I have just examined some prisoners and deserters. There are opposite Deep Bottom Johnson's brigade, of Beauregard's forces; McGowan's brigade (now Conner's), and Lane's brigade. These brigades will average about 900 men. On last Saturday McLaws' division, of Longstreet's corps, came there, consisting of Kershaw's old brigade, Kershaw now commanding the division; Humphreys' brigade, about 700 men, Wofford's brigade, about 800; Bryan's brigade, about 800; Kershaw's brigade, about 800. They are intrenching themselves in front of Foster, between Three and Four Mile Creek. I cannot learn that they extend to our right beyond Four-Mile Creek. It is reported, but this is not certain, that A. P. Hill has relieved Kershaw and is in command of all the troops on the north of the James. A refugee left Richmond on Saturday, reports no troops in Richmond, save the second-class militia that is under eighteen and above forty-five and the foreign legion, of 500 or 600, guarding prisoners and bridges. This is also confirmed by two other refugees that left Richmond yesterday.

BENJ. F. BUTLER,

Major-General.

[Note in General Grant's handwriting.]

The above dispatch just received. It indicates a nervousness about any force going to the north.