War of the Rebellion: Serial 082 Page 0434 OPERATIONS IN SE. VA. AND N. C. Chapter LII.

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equipped for duty, officers and men, Third Brigade, First Division, Tenth Army Corps, 2,374; Third Brigade,

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Division, Nineteenth Army Corps, 1,252; First Connecticut Light Battery, six guns, 119; two companies First New York Mounted Rifles, 115; total, 3,860.

D. B. BIRNEY,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS U. S. FORCES,

Deep Bottom, July 24, 18649.05 a.m.

Brigadier General G. WEITZEL,

Chief of Staff, Department of Virginia and North Carolina:

This morning at daylight the Eleventh Maine, acting under my orders, advanced and occupied the enemy's battery on the New market and Malvern Hill road, and now have a strong picket fifty yards beyond. I shall hold it, if possible. The regiment lost yesterday 2 killed and 6 wounded. They deserve great credit, having been continually engaged day and night for three days, and I deem the position they hold of great importance to this command.

Respectfully, yours,

R. S. FOSTER,

Brigadier-General.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA,

In the Field, July 24, 1864.

General R. S. FOSTER,

Deep Bottom:

The general commanding understand fully the importance of the service rendered by the Eleventh Maine, and has given them credit in his book for the full amount. I telegraphed General Grant last night that I felt confident you would take and hold that battery now.

G. WEITZEL,

Brigadier-General.

HDQRS. THIRD Brigadier, FIRST DIV., 19TH ARMY CORPS,

Camp near Deep Bottom, Va., July 24, 1864.

Captain P. A. DAVIS,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

SIR: I have the honor to report the information of the brigadier-general commanding that I have visited the picket-line and surveyed the vicinity of the command, and that I am of opinion the line is strong. I think it, however, most desirable that the woods on our left front should be held, if possible, under any circumstances, and should the brigadier-general coincide with this view I would submit that on any attack on that point being made that a regiment should be immediately sent to support the pickets. This arrangement, I am aware, would weaken my reserve, but if successful would weaken my reserve, but if successful would, I am of opinion, save much trouble in retaking the woods unless they are completely commanded by the gun-boats. I am now relieving the One hundred and seventy-third New York by the Thirtieth Maine Veteran Volunteers, but I am going to leave the former regiment during the night until after broad daylight in support. I propose to relieve both regiments