War of the Rebellion: Serial 082 Page 0403 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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pounder Parrotts, and the same number for 4 1/2-inch guns, also twenty-five fuse-plug reamers. The muzzle was blown off a 30-pounder Parrott day before yesterday. I am having it cut smooth for further use.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

HENRY L. ABBOT,

Colonel First Connecticut Artillery, Commanding.

JULY 22, 1864-9.20 a.m.

General TERRY,

Commanding Tenth Corps:

The particular reason, I think, why at general headquarters they desire that you should be well prepared on our lines is this: Ewell and Breckinridge are on their suddenly hurled against our line would, if not prepared, go through them, so that you and Foster had better be prepared for any such emergency until we can gain positive information where Ewell and Breckinridge are, or where they intend to strike, if they intend to do so at all.

Respectfully,

G. WEITZEL,

Brigadier-General.

(Same to General Foster.)

JULY 22, 1864-9.40 a.m.

Brigadier-General TERRY,

Tenth Corps:

General Butler directs that Foster wait until some of the Nineteenth Corps come to him. He fears that even if Foster take it to-day he will not be able to hold it, as the enemy's force in his front is three brigades now, two brigades of importance of the point. If the transportation of the Nineteenth had not been so wretchedly managed we could have held that point yesterday. Notify Foster of this.

G. WEITZEL,

Brigadier-General.

(Copy forwarded by Terry to Foster wait until some of the Nineteenth Corps come to him. He fears that even if Foster take it to-day he will not be able to hold it, as the enemy's force in his front is three brigades now, two brigades of infantry and one of cavalry. The general is aware of the importance of the point. If the transportation of the Nineteenth had not been so wretchedly managed we could have held that point yesterday. Notify Foster of this.

G. WEITZEL,

Brigadier-General.

(Copy forwarded by Terry to Foster, 10.30 a.m.)

HEADQUARTERS TENTH ARMY CORPS,

July 22, 1864-9.50 a.m.

Brigadier-General WEITZEL:

I have just received the following dispatch from Brigadier-General Foster.*

It strikes me that if the position is one whose occupation will compel the evacuation of the enemy's works at Malvern they will deem it of sufficient importance to attack it in such numbers that no force which Foster can send there will be able to hold it.

ALF. H. TERRY.

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*See Foster to Terry, beginning-I am going to try, p. 405.

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