War of the Rebellion: Serial 082 Page 0400 OPERATIONS IN SE. VA. AND N. C. Chapter LII.

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BUTLER'S HEADQUARTERS, July 22, 1864.

(Sent 10.40 a. m.)

Lieutenant-General GRANT:

Foster proposed this morning to try and retake that position which the Eleventh Maine took and had to give up yesterday. The position is the intersection of the New Market and Malvern Hill main road with a branch road leading to the Long Bridge main road. It is an important one, as it cuts the direct communication between the rebel forces at Malvern Hill and those at Chaffin's farm. Consequently the enemy would drive him out again, as they are stronger than he is now. He has, therefore, been directed not to make the attempt until re-enforced to-morrow or the day after by a portion of the Nineteenth Corps. That position if held protects perfectly the position at Deep Bottom, the pontoon bridge, the navigation of the river, and I think would force the enemy's batteries and troops from Malvern Hill.

Respectfully,

G. WEITZEL,

Brigadier-General.

CITY POINT, July 22, 1864.

(Received 9.20 p. m.)

General BUTLER:

I see firing again in the same direction as last night. Does Foster still hold the position gained to-day? Has he not been re-enforced? Is the firing seen an attack made by the enemy?

U. S. GRANT.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA, In the Field, July 22, 1864. (Received 9.30 p. m.)

Lieutenant General U. S. GRANT,

City Point:

Nothing new from Foster since noon. He has not been re-enforced. Have telegraphed to him to ascertain what the firing is. I imagine it to be only picket-firing. The enemy, as far as heard from, have only some cavalry at that particular point.

BENJ. F. BUTLER,

Major-General.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA, In the Field, July 22, 1864. (Sent 10.37 p. m.)

Lieutenant General U. S. GRANT,

City Point:

Foster's regiment has fallen back from that position for the night, not having any disposable force to re-enforce it. The firing is below him and is by the gun-boats, which are shelling the flanks of that regiment to keep off the rebels. No symptoms whatever of any pressing or attacking force of the enemy. I have not the least doubt but that that position can be retaken without loss in the morning. It seems to be sort of neutral ground.

G. WEITZEL,

Brigadier-General.