War of the Rebellion: Serial 082 Page 0359 Chapter LII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

Search Civil War Official Records

HEADQUARTERS EIGHTEENTH ARMY CORPS, July 20, 1864.

TO THE OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS OF THE 18TH ARMY CORPS:

I part from you, in accordance with orders from the lieutenant-general commanding the Armies of the United States, with great regret, and my highest pride is that you will share my feelings. Since I have been your commander I have tried to share with you your dangers and have rejoiced with you in your gallant deeds. During this time your record has been bright and unsullied. Whatever in it has not been all that you could wish, I can assure you has been from no fault or shortcoming of yours, and I trust that you will believe that I have been no more culpable than yourselves. May God bless and always crown your efforts with victory.

WM. F. SMITH,

Major-General.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. EIGHTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Numbers 94.

July 20, 1864.

TO THE OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS OF THE 18TH ARMY CORPS:

Sincerely regretting that any circumstances or necessity should deprive us of our late commander and his able leadership, by virtue of Special Orders, Numbers 61, paragraph III, from headquarters Armies of the United States, dated July 18, 1864, I hereby assume command of the Eighteenth Army Corps. I have only to ask that officers and men will be mindful of the favorable reputation which they have acquired by their past conduct and inspired with resolution to maintain it in the future.

J. H. MARTINDALE,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF NORTH CAROLINA, New Berne, N. C., July 20, 1864.

Major General BENJAMIN F. BUTLER,

Commanding Dept. of Virginia and North Carolina, Fort Monroe:

GENERAL: A very kind letter written by you on the 20th of May has been very unaccountably delayed until this morning, when I received it. There was nothing in this letter, however, that required special attention. It inclosed a list of the forces from North Carolina in your front. We have kept the rebels at Kinston in some trouble, and the refugees who have last come in inform me that some re-enforcements had recently arrived there. The ram is still in good order, but aground opposite the town, and I have no fears of her. I hope to be able to destroy that ram yet. An expedition, consisting of two or three officers and about thirty picked men, was to have started to-night to try to get at the railroad by taking the paths through the swamps. If I can procure good guides I am in hopes of being able to interrupt the travel from Wilmington for a time at least.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

I. N. PALMER,

Brigadier-General.

P. S.-I have just learned that a large package of letters from department headquarters, forwarded about 20th of May, was by some blundering carried to Hatteras, and there thrown aside; not discovered until a day or two since. In this package was the letter referred to.

I. N. P.