War of the Rebellion: Serial 082 Page 0343 Chapter LII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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HDQRS. DEPT. OF VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA,

In the Field, July 19, 1864 - 1.40 p. m.

Lieutenant Colonel F. H. PECK,

Twelfth Connecticut Volunteers, City Point:

You will disembark at Bermuda Hundred, and go into camp near there till further orders.

By command of Major-General Butler:

R. S. DAVIS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

CHAMBERLAIN, POINT OF ROCKS,

July 19, 1864 - 3.30 p. m.

Major General B. F. BUTLER,

Commanding Dept. of Va., and N. C., and Army of the James:

GENERAL: I have just returned. The cavalry landed at the wharf to the north of Harrison's Point at 3 a. m. to-day, and scoured the country thoroughly from that point to Charles City Court-House. The infantry landed a mile and a half below Wilcox's Wharf; searched every house and barn for a distance of four miles. No rebel force was discovered, and but two rebel scouts were seen; these were chased by the cavalry but not captured. All the torpedoes were captured by Captain Fitch on Sunday last, and none have been placed in the rivers.

Respectfully and sincerely,

CHARLES K. GRAHAM,

Brigadier-General.

[Indorsement.]

Lieutenant-General GRANT:

I have the honor to forward Brigadier-General Graham's report of an expedition to Wilcox's Wharf and Harrison's Landing, to find and capture torpedo workers.

Respectfully,

BENJ. F. BUTLER,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF NORTH CAROLINA,

New Berne, N. C., July 19, 1864.

Major R. S. DAVIS,

Asst. Adjt. General, Dept. of Virginia and North Carolina:

MAJOR: I respectfully call the attention of the commanding general to the fact the rebels are vigorously pushing the work upon their iron-clad fleet in the Roanoke River. I have good reason to believe that besides the ram Albemarle two others are being build, and if they can succeed in coming into the Sounds together we have no naval force to cope with them. We have a fine set of naval commanders here, and they would doubtless make as good a fight as it would be possible to make with their wooden vessels, but they have all assured me that, although they consider themselves more than a march for one of the iron-clad rams, two or three of them would in all possibility clear the Sounds of our vessels. One or two iron-clads or monitors, could we