War of the Rebellion: Serial 082 Page 0283 Chapter LII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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HEADQUARTERS NINTH ARMY CORPS, July 16, 1864-9 a.m.

General WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

I have nothing of note to report. There was very little firing last night. The enemy have placed sand-bags along their parapet for the benefit of their sharpshooters. The battery is nearly finished at the burnt house, and the main gallery of the mine will be completed to-day.

A. E. BURNSIDE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS NINTH ARMY CORPS, July 16, 1864-9 p.m.

General WILLIAMS:

It has been quiet on my front to-day. Our mortar practice has become very excellent and is doing much execution. One of the shells caused an explosion in one of their redoubts, it is supposed of a magazine, as the explosion was heavy and logs were seen to fly up. The enemy were seen on one occasion to jump on the outside of their works to avoid our shells, there being no picket-firing to prevent them. In General Potter's front some force of the enemy were seen moving to our right, apparently relieving part of their line. We opened on them with artillery. The mine will be under the enemy's works during the night.

A. E. BURNSIDE,

Major-General.

IN THE TRENCHES OF THE NINTH ARMY CORPS,

Near Petersburg, Va., July 16, 1864.

Lieutenant Colonel LEWIS RICHMOND,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Ninth Army Corps:

COLONEL: In obedience to orders from corps headquarters, I entered on duty as general of the trenches at 8 a.m. yesterday, relieving Colonel Steere, Fourth Rhode Island Infantry. Immediately on relieving Colonel Steere I made the round of the trenches and found everything in good condition. The trenches are well built and are covered along their whole front by strong abatis. The batteries from the position they occupy have a good command of the enemy's works along the front of the corps. From the twelve-gun battery now being erected in rear of the burnt house, and which is nearly completed, the entire line of the enemy's works in front of the Ninth Corps, and a good part of the line in front of the Fifth and Tenth Corps, can be reached, enfilading nearly the whole length of the enemy's lines in front of the Tenth Corps. There has been considerable firing by the artillery and mortars during the past twenty-four hours, generally very accurate and with good effect, silencing the enemy's guns almost as soon as opened. At 5 p.m yesterday a magazine was blown up in the enemy's redoubt just to the left of the main road. There has been no change in the line since yesterday, and no work has been done, except on the redoubt in rear of the burnt house.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. HUMPHREYS,

Colonel Second Michigan Infantry.