War of the Rebellion: Serial 082 Page 0263 Chapter LII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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HEADQUARTERS FIFTH ARMY CORPS, July 15, 1864.

Major-General BURNSIDE:

Nothing has been heard from them.

G. K. WARREN,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS SECOND CAVALRY DIVISION, July 15, 1864-10.15 a.m.

Major-General WARREN,

Commanding Fifth Army Corps:

GENERAL: I forward you a deserter sent me by Colonel Bryan, and also the report of one of his officers concerning him. The prisoner says the rebel colonel on foot passed through a dense wood, about 100 yards in extend, between the left of the infantry and right of Colonel Byran's line. The information of the deserter, if reliable, is important, All quiet on the cavalry line.

Yours respectfully,

D. McM. GREGG,

Brigadier-General of Vols., Commanding Second Cavalry Division.

[Inclosure.]

[JULY 15, 1864.]

Colonel BRYAN:

With this dispatch I send to you for examination one Henry Williams, deserters from the rebel lines, who came into my line this morning. Says he is a native of Washington, and was pressed into service a week ago. Reports that an attack will doubtless be made on all our lines to-day or to-morrow, and that some of their officers have been between the cavalry and infantry lines, and even in rear of infantry lines, and drawn correct maps of our lines and works. The infantry line is much weakened, and all the brigade (reserve) left and fell back last night. I think I have found the opening where their officers passed through (if they passed between the two lines), and have thrown in an additional post, but the connection between my line and the infantry is not what is should be, and I cannot remedy the difficulty.

Your obedient servant,

JOHN D. MYRICK,

Captain, First Maine Cavalry, Commanding Outposts.

HEADQUARTERS FIFTH ARMY CORPS, July 15, 1864.

Brigadier-General GREGG:

GENERAL: I have seen the deserter you sent in. I don't think much of his story about there being a gap in our lines where officers went through. I went along the whole line yesterday myself and saw no such place. It is very probable they may make a dash to get information, and if their necessities are great may try to hold out on the railroad. I don't know under what instructions you are operating, but you can strengthen your lines wherever you think necessary. It is not necessary