War of the Rebellion: Serial 082 Page 0241 Chapter LII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

Search Civil War Official Records

HEADQUARTERS FOURTH DIVISION, NINTH ARMY CORPS,

Near Petersburg, Va., July 14, 1864

ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL, FIFTH ARMY CORPS:

SIR: I have the honor to report that the pickets of my command are established on the line directed by Major-General Warren this afternoon. Also to inclose copies of orders desired by the general.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

EDW. FERRERO.

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC.

July 14, 1864

Major-General SHERIDAN,

Commanding Cavalry Corps:

The major-general commanding directs that you get ready at the earliest practicable moment for a movement against the enemy's communications, extending into North Carolina as far as Weldon. You will report to him at once at what time you will probably be prepared to move and what will be the strength of your corps available for the operation. The commanding general directs that during this movement one of the regularly organized brigades of cavalry be left with the army to picket and scout on its left flank.

A. A. HUMPHREYS.

Major-General and Chief of Staff.

HDQRS. CAVALRY CORPS, ARMY OF THE POTOMAC.

Jordan's Point, Va., July 14, 1864.

Major General A. A. HUMPHREYS.

Chief of Staff:

GENERAL: I have the honor to report the receipt of your dispatch of this date. I can move on the morning of the 16th with an effective strength of between 8,000 and 9,000 men. Will you have the kindness to inform me more in detail of the contemplated movement, so that I can as quickly as possible make the necessary preparations?

P. H. SHERIDAN,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC.

July 14, 1864

Major-General SHERIDAN

Commanding Cavalry Corps:

GENERAL: I inclose herewith a copy of a dispatch* from Lieutenant-General Grant to the major-general commanding the army as exhibiting fully the objects of the expedition which you were directed to prepare your command for, and the importance of its successful execution. The commanding general directs me to say that you will regard that dispatch as conveying your instructions, and that he desires to have, as

---------------

*See Grant to Meade, beginning-There is no chance, p. 224.

---------------

16 R R-VOL XL, PT III