War of the Rebellion: Serial 082 Page 0226 OPERATIONS IN SE. VA. AND N.C. Chapter LII.

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not injured and trains were expected to be running to-day. Telegraphic communication was open yesterday with Philadelphia. It is rumored that Franklin, who was captured with the train at Gunpowder bridge, afterward escaped. I have no confirmation of the report,however.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC.

OFFICE OF PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL,

July 14, 1864

Major-General HUMPHREYS, Chief of Staff:

GENERAL: Three deserters from Finegan's brigade (Fourth Battalion and Ninth Florida Regiment) came into the lines of the Fifth Corps this and Ninth Florida Regiment) came into the lines of the Fifth Corps this a.m. about 2 o'clock. From them we can learn little or nothing. They have been on picket all night. Up to the time they left the trenches they knew of no movements on their right or left having taken place for a week or more, excepting the force lately sent down the Weldon railroad. Neither of the deserters know what is on their right or left and are all stupid and unintelligent. All the information obtained amounts only to this, that their brigade (Finegan's) and Mahone's division was in the same position last night that it has been for the past week or more, and that they have not seen or heard of any movements, excepting that of a part of their corps, a few days since.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. C. BABCOCK,

[Indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC.

July 14, 1864-10.30 a.m.

Lieutenant-General GRANT:

Forwarded as the only information received to-day.

GEO. G. MEADE.

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC.

OFFICE OF PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL.

July 14, 1864.

General HUMPHREYS:

A contraband came into our lines about 3 o'clock this afternoon from Petersburg. He left the city this morning and has been hanging about the lines all day waiting for a good [chance] to get through. He got permission to go beyond the works to gather blackberries, and by representing himself as one of the officers' servants, strolled outside the pickets. He has been a fireman on the South Side Railroad, but has not been on the road since it was destroyed. He resides on Old Street near Sycamore, and has been living there for the past year. He says that no troops have passed north for the past two weeks from Lee's army, excepting two regiments of infantry that went to Richmond last Friday. He has a wife residing at Dunn's Hill, on the Chesterfield side of the Appomattox River. He has been in the habit of visiting her frequently, and left there this morning. He says that the Seven-