War of the Rebellion: Serial 082 Page 0186 OPERATIONS IN SE.VA. AND N.C. Chapter LII.

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confer with General Warren as to withdrawing General Gibbon's pickets. General Warren has so much of his force employed in the trenches and working parties that it may be necessary you should furnish him some force to assist in picketing his line. If os, I desire you to furnish it. The line of pickets need not be so far out as before you vacated your recent position, but the cavalry pickets of them should be strong, with good reserves, so that Warren could be notified of any advance of the enemy. This dispatch is predicated on the supposition that the enemy remains on the defensive. If to-morrow morning any movement is reported which looks like and advance on their part you will exercise your judgment about meeting it, whether to check them by advancing or retiring to the position now occupied by Warren and Ferrero. When you have withdrawn Gregg should report to Warren and to these headquarters. Bryan should be directed to report to Warren.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS SECOND CORPS, July 12, 1864.

Major-General WARREN:

I understood from General Meade this morning that you were to relieve part of my picket-line. I do not know that it can be done in the daylight. My picket-line now strikes my old breast-works near the Strong house, which would be a very good place for you to break off in case I move. While I am here I keep up the line running near Smith's and Temple's to Sturdivant's Mill, but if I move my picket will be withdrawn. If I move during the day I will leave on the men on the extreme right in plain sight of the enemy.

WINF'D S. HANCOCK,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, July 12, 1864-9.50 p.m.

General HANCOCK:

I have just returned to my headquarters and find you dispatch about relieving your pickets. I have sent word to General Crawford to od it to-night. I hope you will not have to withdraw your picket-line before to-morrow night, as I will have to work all day to-morrow before I can make the lines secure. The enemy perhaps will feel us to-morrow to see what is going on, and I have made all arrangements I can to meet such a contingency.

G. K. WARREN,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS SECOND ARMY CORPS, July 12, 1864-11 p.m.

Major-General WARREN,

Commanding Fifth Corps:

Your dispatch of 9.50 is received. Unless the enemy appears here in the morning, I am ordered to withdraw to the rear of your headquarters as a reserve to cover the left flank. Colonel Smyth, commanding one of General Gibbon's brigades, pickets from the left of your line to