War of the Rebellion: Serial 082 Page 0178 OPERATIONS IN SE.VA. AND N.C. Chapter LII.

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statement reliable and believe the movement to have been made; if they met with no force on the railroad they would make a demonstration in our rear. Scout Carney returned this a.m. Our agent was at Ennis' farm yesterday cradling oats in sight of the railroad. Yesterday afternoon about 4 o'clock he saw troops passing south on the Halifax road; thinks there was a division; was told by a man who came up from Reams' Station that they crossed just below Reams' and went to Proctor's on the Jerusalem plank road. Could not learn whose division it was. There was a brigade of cavalry at Ennis' house last night; was there at 3 o'clock this morning. Our agent has been constantly in sight of the railroad for the past two or three days. No troops have been moved on the railroad either way to his knowledge. The cars have been running regularly since the road was repaired and the supplies have not been taken into the city, but unloaded at lead-works and issued from that point to the troops. Arrangements have been made with our agent to find out more particulars concerning this movement, where the force has really gone, and what it is.

JOHN C. BABCOCK.

PLANK ROAD SIGNAL STATION, July 12, 1864.

Major-General HUMPHREYS,

Chief of Staff:

GENERAL: Two trains of cars came up the Weldon railroad - one train of eight box-cars and two platform-cars, loaded, apparently, with grain; the other train of six platform-cars was empty. About 2,000 infantry marched toward Petersburg, along the Weldon railroad, entering the line of works near the lead-works. Everything else in the enemy's lines seems quiet, though small working parties are digging in the vicinity of the Gregory House.

B. F. FISHER,

Captain and Chief Signal Officer.

[Indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, July 12-8.30 a.m.

General GRANT:

The above just received. This looks as if the troops seen yesterday moving down the railroad were the relief to the infantry guards on the road, and the body now mentioned are the relieved returning. Gregg has come up with his division and has been ordered to reconnoiter toward Reams' Station and Proctor's Tavern. I hope he will get some information.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

CITY POINT, July 12, 1864.

(Received 10.30 a.m.)

Major-General MEADE:

The last news I have had from Maryland was to the evening of the 10th. At that time Wallace had been beaten at Monocacy, and was retreating toward Baltimore in disorder. I got a dispatch from the President dated yesterday; but it gave no news of the invasion. Butler