War of the Rebellion: Serial 082 Page 0127 Chapter LII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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[Indorsement.]

The above project, being in conformity with my views, is approved and adopted. The operations against the salient on the plank road and the battery in front of the Ninth Corps will be at once commenced.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

CITY POINT, July 10, 1864-10.30 a.m.

(Received 4.30 p.m.)

Brigadier General M. C. MEIGS,

Quartermaster-General:

General Wright left at 10 a.m. His troops number 11,000. They are embarking rapidly. There are boats enough here now for 7,000. I expect more boats will arrive in time. General Wright's artillery and trains are left behind.

RUFUS INGALLS,

Quartermaster.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL'S DEPARTMENT,

July 10, 1864.

Major-General HUMPHREYS:

Four deserters from Finegan's (Florida) brigade, one from the Ninth Regiment, the others from the First Battalion, came into our lines this morning on the front of the Fifth Corps. They state that night before last they relieved Wright's brigade, which went in reserve. Their brigade had been in reserve for more than a week. They have little knowledge of what is going on outside of their division. The troops have been at work lately constructing fortified passages, to enable the reserves and troops from different points on the line to re-enforce any part of the front without having to uncover themselves. They all complain of short rations. A quarter of a pound of bacon, three-quarters of a pound of corn meal, and a little sugar and coffee once a week has been the ration for some time past. Absurd camp rumors regarding Early's movements are afloat in their division but they know nothing reliable concerning him.

Very respectfully,

J. C. BABCOCK.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL'S DEPARTMENT,

July 10, 1864.

Major-General HUMPHREYS,

Chief of Staff:

GENERAL: Two colored men, representing themselves to be firemen lately employed on the Weldon and Petersburg Railroad, came into the lines of the Second Army Corps about 8 o'clock last evening. They left Petersburg about dark. They live near the railroad shops, and not being permitted to go about the city or the lines can give little information except on railroad matters. One train ran through to