War of the Rebellion: Serial 082 Page 0085 Chapter LII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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HEADQUARTERS SIEGE ARTILLERY, Broadway Landing, July 8, 1864-11 a. m.

Lieutenant Colonel E. W. SMITH:

I have just been directed to send another company of my regiment to Petersburg. I have taken Company A from Battery Numbers 6. One company still remains there, which is ample to serve the battery and hold the work itself.

H. L. ABBOT,

Colonel First Connecticut Artillery.

[First indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS TENTH ARMY CORPS, July 8, 1864.

Respectfully referred to Brigadier-General Terry, commanding First Division, for his information. This paper to be returned.

By order of Brigadier-General Brooks:

ED. W. SMITH,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

[Second indorsement.]

JULY 8, 1864.

Received and read.

A. H. TERRY,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS SIEGE TRAIN, July 8, 1864-10 a. m.

Captain BROOKER,

First Connecticut Artillery, in charge of Siege Guns, General Burnside's Headquarters:

I have ordered Captain Gillett, with a platoon of Company A, to relieve Lieutenant Sergeant as soon as they can get there. Lieutenant Sergeant is to report to Major Trumbull as soon as relieved. Please see that no delay occurs.

HENRY L. ABBOT,

Colonel First Connecticut Artillery.

HEADQUARTERS SIEGE ARTILLERY, July 8, 1864-1.30 p. m.

Major TRUMBULL,

First Connecticut Artillery, General Smith's Headquarters:

A 13-inch mortar on a truck carriage has been sent this morning to gravel cut on the railroad near General Smith's headquarters. The ammunition, &c., will be started as soon as possible. Everything is in confusion in consequence of no notification having been received until too late. I have ordered Captain Osborne, with the remaining platoon of Company G, to report to you at once to take charge of this mortar. Divide the company properly between it and the six-mortar battery. Send an orderly at once to find the mortar. I give Captain Osborne verbal explanations respecting its objects. I send in Captain Dow's wagon thirty 12-pounder howitzer canisters; they weigh twice as much