War of the Rebellion: Serial 082 Page 0068 OPERATIONS IN SE. VA. AND N. C. Chapter LII.

Search Civil War Official Records

which considerable work was done. I hope to have the guns in position to-morrow morning. The work is in front of the present position occupied by a section of Twitchell's battery. The covered way being built was about completed last night. The enemy opened upon our heavy battery this morning from their salient redoubt.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

O. B. WILLCOX,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS THIRD DIVISION, CAVALRY CORPS, July 7, 1864-9.30 a. m.

Major-General HUMPHREYS,

Chief of Staff:

In my report of yesterday should have been "2,927 men are shipped to Baltimore."

P. H. SHERIDAN,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS CAVALRY CORPS, July 7, 1864.

Brigadier General S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Army of the Potomac:

GENERAL: I respectfully request that Captain Martin's (Sixth New York) independent battery of horse artillery, now in Washington, be ordered to report to me without delay, to supply the place of Captain Maynadier's battery, lost in the recent expedition to destroy the railroad at Burkeville. This battery is completely fitted up and belonged to the Cavalry Corps, and is now in fine condition.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

P. H. SHERIDAN,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, July 7, 1864.

Brigadier General J. H. WILSON,

Commanding Third Cavalry Division:

GENERAL: Your letter of the 5th instant in reply to the communication addressed to you from these headquarters under date of July 4, in relation to certain statements contained in the Richmond Examiner of July 2, respecting the conduct of your troops on the occasion of your recent expedition, has been received and laid before the major-general commanding, by whom I am instructed to say that it was not his design to reflect in the slightest degree upon the behavior of yourself and command during your absence. As the editorial to which your attention was invited specified with marked particularity the parties whose watches, plate, &c., were said to have been seized, the commanding general considered it but due to you that you should have an opportunity of placing on record for future reference, if necessary, an emphatic denial of the allegations. As the commanding general feared that notwithstanding your best efforts to prevent marauding, some individuals of your command might have seized private property, and appropriated the same to their own use, he thought it best to desire an inspection to be made with a view of ascertaining whether any of your troops had