War of the Rebellion: Serial 082 Page 0033 Chapter LII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.- UNION.

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directed to send them to Washington, as they can be equipped more rapidly there than here, and be put to some service at once. This will make nearly 9,000 men sent from this army, which I trust will meet the exigency, as I should be reluctant to spare any more. Everything was quiet yesterday and last night with the exception of General Burnside, who opened a battery on what he believed to be a working party of the enemy during the night.

GEO. G. MEADE.

Major-General.

CITY POINT, VA., July 6, 1864-11.30 a.m.

Major-General MEADE,

Commanding, &c.;

I have no doubt but that the force you have sent to Washington will prove sufficient, and not only that, but that they will speedily return, the cavalry fully mounted and equipped. Hunter has got a portion of his force up to the enemy, and is concentrating the balance as rapidly as possible. If they succeed in nearly annihilating Ewell, Breckinridge, &c., Hunter will be able to move through to Charlottesville and utterly destroy the railroad and canals without the help of the troops sent from here.

U. S. GRANT

Lieutenant-General.

CITY POINT, VA., July 6, 1864-11.35 a.m.

Major-General MEADE:

Commanding, &c.,:

The troops going to Washington need not take teams, ambulances, or ammunition, except what they carry in boxes. I expect them back here so soon that there is no necessity for transporting the teams back and forth. Besides there is now in Washington about 600 teams ready for issue, if necessary.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC.

July 6, 1864-2.10 p.m.

Lieutenant-Colonel BOWERS:

Just before this army left Brandy Station the lieutenant-general commanding verbally instructed me to move with 150 rounds of small-arm ammunition per man, 50 rounds to be carried on the person and 100 rounds in the wagons, and for the transportation of small-arm ammunition five wagons were allowed for every 1,000 men. Special Orders, Numbers 44, of June 28, 1864, from your headquarters, provide three wagons only for every 1,000 men for the transportation of small-arm ammunition. It is estimated that 1,000 rounds of small-arm ammunition weigh about 100 pounds, and under the allowance of three wagons per 1,000 men,each wagon would have to carry about 3,300 pounds besides the forage for the team. It is respectfully submitted that with this weight the wagons would be considerably overloaded, and I have therefore the honor to request that I may be informed whether in reduc-

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