War of the Rebellion: Serial 082 Page 0030 OPERATIONS IN SE. VA.AND N.C. Chapter LII.

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JULY 5, 1864.

MR. BENNETT,

Clerk at Headquarters, Fort Monroe:

Send me 100,000 yards of strong kite-string at once. Also all the President's proclamations there are in the offices.

BENJ. F. BUTLER,

Major-General, Commanding.

HDQRS. DEPT OF WASHINGTON, 22nd ARMY CORPS,

July 5, 1864.

General BARNES, Willard's Hotel:

The Secretary thinks you had better go down to Point Lookout at once. You had better get a tug from Rucker. He is a little anxious concerning the prisoners there, in reference to the movement of the rebels near Harper's Ferry. Please report to me by telegraph every evening.

Yours, truly,

C. C. AUGUR,

Major-General, U. S. Volunteers.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF NORTH CAROLINA,

New Berne, N. C., July 5, 1864.

Major R. S. DAVIS,

Asst. Adjt. General, Hdqrs. Dept. of Va.and N. C., Ft. Monroe, Va.:

SIR: Some days since I notified the commanding general of the return of the expedition sent under Colonel Claassen toward Kinston. This expedition succeeded not only in capturing the outpost, but the commanding officer of the enemy's forces in Kinston with his adjutant were also brought here prisoners. At the same time this force was operating toward Kinston I had ordered Colonel Jourdan, commanding Sub-District of Beaufort, to proceed with about 1,000 infantry and 250 cavalry with a couple of mountain howitzers and endeavor to cut the Wilmington and Weldon Railroad, and if possible to destroy the bridge over Northeast Cape Fear River. The movement was commenced very secretly, but upon the arrival of the command at Jacksonville it became evident to Colonel Jourdan that our movements were known and that every precaution had been taken to defeat the object of the expedition. Colonel Jourdan felt so sure of his inability to cope with the forces assembling in his front that he reluctantly concluded to abandon further operations and he accordingly returned. This movement was not, however, without its good results, some twenty-two prisoners and about the same number of horses were captured and the whole country from Weldon to Wilmington was alarmed. At the same time that these expeditions were out I had ordered a small force on a steamer to the Pungo River to sieze some vessels said to be there preparing to make a descent upon our light-houses. One of the naval officers, Captain Graves, of the Lockwood, and a party of sailors accompanied this expedition, which succeeded in capturing three schooners and a large amount of shingles and bringing them to this place. I have another plan on foot for harassing the rebels in this vicinity which I will explain in due time.

I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

I. N. PALMER,

Brigadier-General.