War of the Rebellion: Serial 081 Page 0625 Chapter LII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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that it was not advisable to do it by assault; not that I could not carry on "any offensive operations" in my front. With a successful "if" like General Burnside's I could do anything. I think the responsibility for operations on our front, in which the whole army is to take part, should rest on other opinion or authority than General Burnside or myself, because of our ignorance of the relative advantages of different points, and the alternatives left the lieutenant-general, and for many other reasons when we approach possibilities. I would respectfully request, then, that General Hunt and Major Duane be directed to include my front in their examinations, remove the opinion assigned to me from their instructions and let the operations to be begun and their location rest upon their investigation. In everything that is to be done I promise my cheerful co-operation.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. K. WARREN,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, July 4, 1864.

[Major-General WARREN:]

GENERAL: Your note of this date has been received. I have no objections to directing General Hunt and Major Duane to reconnoiter your line if you desire it. They were not sent to reconnoiter Burnside's line, but to examine into the particular point where Burnside proposed to exploded to explode his mine, and to see what preliminary arrangements would be required in case it was determined to attack at that point. I think you misunderstand the meaning of the confidential character of the note written you yesterday. I did not mean to say I would not use the information given by you, but only that I did not wish made public the question being mooted. It would have been better for me to have marked the instructions to Hunt and Duane confidential, and it was an oversight not doing so. In my report to-day to the lieutenant-general commanding I expressed the opinion that an assault from either the Ninth or Fifth Corps front was impracticable and unadvisable and gave no authority for the opinion, although I did say I had conferred with corps commanders.

Respectfully, yours,

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General, Commanding.

I have not see General Barnard and know nothing of his views, but when I called on you for your opinion I designed the question should be treated as a military one, and had no reference myself to the willingness or boldness independent of military confederation.

HEADQUARTERS FIFTH CORPS, July 4, 1864.

Major-General HUMPHREYS:

GENERAL: I propose to-night to commence the erection of a strong redoubt on my line near the plank road as a point-d'appui for our left in case out lines are changed.

Respectfully,

G. K. WARREN,

Major-General of Volunteers.

40 R R-VOL XL, PT II