War of the Rebellion: Serial 081 Page 0619 Chapter LII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, July 4, 1864. (Received 5th.)

Lieutenant-General GRANT:

The Secretary of War directs that Brigadier General J. G. Barnard be relieved from his present duties, and to report in person, without delay, to the Chief of Engineers, in this city. Please acknowledge receipt.

E. D. TOWNSEND,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

WASHINGTON, July 4, 1864 - 8.10 p. m.

Major General J. G. BARNARD:

(Care Lieutenant-General Grant, U. S. Army.)

I have the pleasure of informing you that this morning you were nominated a major-general by brevet for distinguished and meritorious service, and the nomination was confirmed by the Senate.

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, July 4, 1864 - 10 a. m.

Lieutenant-General GRANT:

Everything was quiet along my lines yesterday and last night except the usual picket and artillery practice in front of the Ninth Corps, which does not seem to result in any casualties. Report of scouting parties on my left would seem to indicate the presence of the enemy's cavalry, and one report states infantry at Rowanty Swamp, Stony Creek, and Dinwiddie Court-House. These are undoubtedly precautions taken to meet any cavalry raids on our part, or attempts to interrupts the communication heretofore reported as existing between Petersburg and the railroad below Stony Creek Depot. Major-General Sheridan reports his command at Jordan's Point and Old Court-House and expresses the opinion it will require fifteen days to get his animals into a serviceable condition.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, July 4, 1864 - 12 m.

Lieutenant-General GRANT:

After examination and conference with corps commanders I am satisfied an immediate assault on the enemy's line in my front is impracticable. The enemy now occupies the line held by him on the 18th ultimo, which i vainly endeavored to dislodge him from. Not having succeeded then, when he had only occupied this line some twelve hours, I cannot expect to do it now that he has been two weeks strengthening and adding to it. The only plan to dislodge the enemy from this line is by a regular approach. Major-General Burnside is now running a gallery to a mine to be constructed under a battery on this line, which General B. thinks when exploded will enable him by a formidable assault to carry the line of works. I have directed the chiefs of artillery and of engineers to examine into this point and to make all the necessary preliminary arrangements for the establishment of batteries bearing on the point