War of the Rebellion: Serial 081 Page 0603 Chapter LII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

Search Civil War Official Records

teers to the Third Brigade; the One hundred and twentieth New York Volunteers to the First Brigade; the Eighty-fourth Pennsylvania Volunteers to the Second Brigade.

Officers of staff departments rendered supernumerary by this consolidation will at once report to the chiefs of their respective departments at these headquarters.

* * * * * * *

By command of Major-General Hancock:

FRANCIS A. WALKER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS SECOND DIVISION, July 3, 1864 - 10.10 a. m.

Lieutenant-Colonel WALKER,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Second Corps:

COLONEL: The staff officer (Captain Embler) who established my picket-line yesterday reports that he relieved the pickets of one division (composed of details of four brigades) of the Sixth Corps, with 350 men; 600 men were sent out, and the surplus (250) will be brought in to-day. They were not brought back yesterday because the distance was great and the day very hot. Captain Embler does not think our picket-line extends to the left of our front much, if any. My topographical officer is just going out of examine the ground, and I am going down to see General Wright upon the subject. Although details from four brigades were relieved they did not cover a whole division front, as the Sixth Corps divisions had one or two brigades in the second line.

Respectfully,

JOHN GIBBON,

Major-General of Volunteers, Commanding Division.

HEADQUARTERS FIFTH ARMY CORPS, July 3, 1864 - 11 a. m.

Brigadier-General WILLIAMS:

All quiet in my front last night.

G. K. WARREN,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, July 3, 1864 - 12 m.

Major-General WARREN:

The following communication has been received from the lieutenant-general commanding:

Do you think it possible, by a bold and decisive attack, to break through the enemy's center, say in General Warren's front somewhere? If this is determined on we would want full preparations made in advance so there should be no balk. Roads would have to be made to bring the troops up rapidly; batteries constructed so as to bring the greatest amount of artillery to bear possible on the points of attack; and all to the right of the attack strengthened to be held by the smallest number of men. I send this to get views on the subject.