War of the Rebellion: Serial 081 Page 0579 Chapter LII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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all arrangements made for the attack when one of his brigade commanders blundered, exposing the whole move. Smith, therefore, did not make it.

G. WEITZEL,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS TENTH CORPS,

July 1, 1864.

General WEITZEL:

The big gun has arrived, but there is no gin or anything to handle it with, nor any ammunition.

W. T. H. BROOKS,

Brigadier-General.

JULY 1, 1864.

General BROOKS:

Wilson is all right. Coming in on Suffolk road. No details know.

G. WEITZEL,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS TENTH CORPS,

July 1, 1864.

General FOSTER:

What is the news from your garrison below Four-Mile Creek? What work are you having done? Was it laid out by the engineers?

W. T. H. BROOKS,

Brigadier-General.

GENERAL FOSTER'S HEADQUARTERS,

July 1, 1864.

General BROOKS:

The enemy's shell fell short of the camp of the garrison and did no damage. We are strengthening the rifle-pits, making an infantry parapet of them and putting abatis in front. The work is all laid out and superintended by the engineers.

R. S. FOSTER,

Brigadier-General.

FORT MONROE, July 1, 1864.

Major-General SMITH,

Eighteenth Corps:

Colonel Abbot is mistaken about the number of 8-inch mortar shells. There are 6,000 here and on the road to City Point, and 2,000 more on the road from New York here. We have 5,,300 8-inch columbiad shells. We have a large quantity of the round bullets and condemned smooth-bore ammunition, which I will send up, also quantity of port lines. Captain Edson, ordnance officer, suggests a practical difficulty in using the bits of iron mixed with the bursting charge in the mortar shells, to wit-the liability of the iron while in motion to explode the charge.

BENJ. F. BUTLER,

Major-General, Commanding.