War of the Rebellion: Serial 081 Page 0573 Chapter LII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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safety of any portion of the line you now hold, relieving General Gibbon's troops as far as you are able to extend. This is to be done at daylight to-morrow.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

FRANCIS A. WALKER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS FOURTH DIVISION. NINTH ARMY CORPS,

July 1, 1864.

Lieutenant-Colonel WALKER,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Second Army Corps:

COLONEL: Upon a second conversation this p.m. I thought it was perfectly understood what position I was to occupy, which is the one indicated in your letter. My troops are in that position since 5 o'clock last evening.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

EDW. FERRERO,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

July 1, 1864.-10.30 p.m.

Brigadier-General FERRERO,

Commanding Division:

The major-general commanding directs that upon being relieved by General Wright to-morrow you take post at the crossing of the Black-water by the old Norfolk road and picket from the left of the Sixth Corps picket-line, near Sturdivant's Mill, toward Prince George Court-House.

A. A. HUMPHREYS,

Major-General and Chief of Staff.

HDQRS. CAVALRY CORPS, ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

Lee's Mill, Va., July 1, 1864-2 a.m.

Major-General HUMPHREYS,

Chief of Staff:

I am in receipt of your note directing me to follow in the direction General Wilson is reported to have gone. I will move in the morning, but it will be at the risk of dismounting my command. I marched from the river without forage and without preparation. My horses are worn out. Some of them have been without forage for forty-eight hours. I am satisfied that General Wilson cannot keep any considerable body of his command together. I thought it best to keep open the roads leading to the south, so that small parties can come in as they are now doing.

Very respectfully,

P. H. SHERIDAN,

Major-General, Commanding.