War of the Rebellion: Serial 081 Page 0560 OPERATIONS IN SE. VA. AND N. C. Chapter LII.

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[Second indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

OFFICE OF PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL,

July 1, 1864.

Respectfully returned. Mr. Swinton cannot be found in the army, but is relieved to be in Washington, where a notice has been sent him not to return to this army.

M. R. PATRICK,

Provost-Marshal-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

July 1, 1864-9 a.m.

Lieutenant-General GRANT:

Nothing reliable from or of Wilson. There is a report from some of the escaped men that he was obliged to surrender, but I cannot trace it to any reliable source. I forward you a dispatch received this a.m. from Major-General Sheridan, with my reply thereto*. I cannot understand how General Sheridan at Wind-Mill Point could be forty-eight hours without forage, and have directed an investigation to ascertain upon whom the responsibility rests. As to the fatigue of his animals I presume the enemy cannot be in much better condition, and Hampton must have made a forced march from the White House via Richmond. The heavy firing between midnight and daybreak this morning was Burnside trying to silence a battery of the enemy who were shelling the Tenth Corps on his right. All the rest of the lines quiet.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

July 1, 1864-5 p.m.

Lieutenant-General GRANT:

One of Colonel Sharpe's scouts is just in, who left Wilson's command at 7 o'clock this morning on the road from Suffolk to Prince George Court-House, Wilson having yesterday succeeded in crossing the Blackwater. The scout thinks he has most of his command with him, although he was obliged to abandon all property, and many of the men are dismounted. He will be in by night.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General, Commanding.

CITY POINT, VA., July 1, 1864.

Major-General MEADE:

Will it not be well send orders for Sheridan to return now that Wilson is heard from? I regret the disaster, but the work done by Wilson and his cavalry is of great importance. I understand from Kautz's description that it will take the enemy several weeks to repair the damage done the South Side and Danville roads.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

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*See Sheridan to Meade, 2 a.m., and Meade to Sheridan, 5 a.m., pp. 573, 574.

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